Drug Cures Ebola in Monkeys, Human Tests are Planned Next

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreAn experimental Ebola drug shows promise for fighting the disease after it cured monkeys that were already sick with fever from the virus. The three animals received the drug and showed no signs of the disease after 28 days.So far, there is no working vaccine or cure for the virus, but after the promising results with monkeys, human trials are planned for later this year.“This is the first study to show post-exposure protection… against the new Makona outbreak strain of Ebola-Zaire virus,” said University of Texas scientist Thomas Geisbert, who was the senior author of the study published in the journal Nature.The drug, called TKM-Ebola-Guinea, works by blocking genes to keep the disease from reproducing and spreading through the body. It targets three genes of Ebola responsible for replication using something called siRNA — or “small interfering RNA.” It does exactly what its name suggests, latching onto the viral strand of Ebola, and slicing it into harmless pieces unable to reproduce the virus.The drug specifically targets the Makona strain of the virus responsible for the recent outbreak in West Africa, but its manufacturer, Tekmira Pharmaceuticals, says the drug can be adapted for any strain of Ebola and can be manufactured in as little as eight weeks.This, along with a drug made from tobacco plants called ZMapp and another drug named brincidofovir, which are also going through tests, show promise of better treatments for the disease. Further, several vaccines are currently being tested in Guinea, Liberia and Sierra Leone to actually prevent the disease.(WATCH an animation below or READ more from BBC) – Photo courtesy of TKMStory tip from Larisa WhiteAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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On Your Feet! National Tour Will Star Christie Prades & Mauricio Martinez

first_img Related Shows Christie Prades & Mauricio Martinez(Photo: Vivacity Media Group) View Comments On Your Feet!center_img Christie Prades will star as Gloria Estefan and Mauricio Martinez will play Emilio Estefan in the first national tour of On Your Feet!. Martinez will also perform the role of Emilio on Broadway from July 11-August 13; current star Ektor Rivera will return to production for the final week of the musical’s run at the Marquis Theatre, which plays its final Broadway performance on August 20.Born and raised in Miami to Cuban immigrant parents, Prades has understudied the role of Gloria in the Broadway production of On Your Feet!. Her past regional credits include In the Heights and West Side Story.Martinez is an award-winning actor and recording artist, who stars in NBC Universo’s first original scripted TV series El Vato and was recently seen in the hit series Señora Acero 2. Martinez has starred in Mexican productions of several Broadway plays and musicals, including Beauty and the Beast, Saturday Night Fever, The Drowsy Chaperone, Sweet Charity, and the Spanish-language premieres of The Last Five Years and Songs from an Unmade Bed. He made his U.S. theater debut in Kansas City Repertory’s production of Evita as Che in 2016.As previously announced, the 80-week tour will launch on September 22 in Buffalo, NY. Show Closed This production ended its run on Aug. 20, 2017last_img read more

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Ron Cioffi named Rutland Chamber Business Person of the Year

first_imgThe Rutland Region Chamber of Commerce announced on October 29, 2014 at their Annual Meeting (sponsored by GE-Avaiation) that Ron Cioffi (Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer) at Rutland Area Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice is the Chamber’s 2014 Business Person of the Year. Cioffi was presented the award by Congressman Peter Welch, Rutland City Mayor Chris Louras, and Chamber officials. Tom Donahue (Executive Vice President/CEO) of the Chamber, called Cioffi “a tireless advocate for community health.” In 2013 RAVNAH served 2.589 clients making 92,168 visits to residents in Rutland County. A major employer, Rutland Area Visiting Nurse Association (RAVNAH) employs 342 people with 287 in Rutland and another 55 in Bennington, due to the recent merger with Bennington’s VNA which on October 1 became part of the larger RAVNAH family.Ron Cioffi, Executive Director and CEO at RAVNAH receives the Business Person of the Year Award from Chamber EVP/CEO Tom Donahue, Chamber President Dave Correll, Congressman Peter Welch and Rutland City Mayor Chris Louras. Photo by Christopher ThayerDonahue gave a brief presentation on the Chamber’s accomplishments over the past year and upcoming projects including the 2nd Annual Vermont Gift Show & Craft Fair sponsored by Vermont Country Store on November 22nd and the Chamber’s new web page to be launched in December.The Keynote Speaker for the meeting (attended by over 200 people) was motivational speaker Ross Gibson from The Richards Group.  Gibson spoke about Leadership.last_img read more

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SM East players Troutwine and Appletoft sign college baseball letters of intent

first_imgGunnar Troutwine (L-seated) and Quinn Appletoft sign letters of intent. Standing behind them are (L-R) Myra, Brent and Lars Troutwine, Jerrod Ryherd , Debra and Ron AppletoftTwo SM East baseball players signed letters of intent to play college baseball next year on the first day of signing.Gunnar Troutwine and Quinn Appletoft committed to college programs Wednesday during a signing ceremony in the SM East library. Troutwine will play for Wichita State University and Appletoft will play for Southwest Baptist University.Troutwine is a catcher who posted a .391 batting average last spring and was second team All Sunflower League. He hit three home runs, four doubles, scored 19 runs and had seven RBIs. He batted .500 during the summer with two home runs.Appletoft is a pitcher who threw 34 innings last summer with 31 strikeouts, posting a 4.1 ERA and a 6-3 record. His first connection with Southwest Baptist was when he played in a tournament at the school last year, he said, and felt it was a good fit for him.Troutwine said he Wichita State had recruited him and it stood out among other Midwestern schools, which is where he wanted to stay.Both boys thanked their parents, coaches and teammates for helping them progress to the point they could get a college scholarship. SM East coach Jerrod Ryherd also spoke about the boys’ accomplishments.Principal John McKinney thanked them for representing SM East. “You’ve made us all proud,” he said.last_img read more

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USD 232 elementary students to return to full-time in-person learning Oct. 8

first_imgElementary students in the USD 232 school district in De Soto are returning to full on-site learning on Thursday, Oct. 8.After about two hours of deliberations, the USD 232 Board of Education in De Soto on Monday voted 5-2 to accept the district’s COVID Advisory Committee’s recommendation to remain in the yellow zone of the Kansas Schools Gating Criteria. The school board further recommended that students in grades pre-K through 5 transition to on-site learning next week.Board President Danielle Heikes and board member Stephanie Makalous voted in dissent.Meanwhile, the neighboring Shawnee Mission School District also returns elementary students to in-person learning Oct. 5. Blue Valley schools return elementary students to in-person the same day as Shawnee Mission, while secondary students will begin hybrid learning.All USD 232 students are currently in the hybrid learning environment, with the exception of students who opted into the district’s full-remote learning program for the semester.The board’s decision comes as USD 232 schools enter the third full week of school. Classes started Sept. 8.Background: The school board last month directed Superintendent Frank Harwood to create a COVID Advisory Committee. The committee’s general purpose is to offer the district guidance on interpreting COVID-19 trends and determining whether USD 232 schools should be in in-person, remote or hybrid learning environments.Board member Ashley Spaulding said some teachers reported they’re “at a breaking point” with the hybrid learning model. Other board members said they’ve heard the hybrid is working well.The committee met last week for the first time and recommended the school district remain in the yellow zone. After much discussion, the committee also recommended giving equal weight to each metric of the Kansas Schools Gating Criteria via a point system. The metrics include things like absenteeism, the two-week positive case rate in Johnson County and local hospital capacity. The green category is 1 point, yellow is 2 points, orange is 3 and red is 4.Harwood said one of the most heavily discussed topics included the students, teachers and families’ social-emotional needs and mental health and well-being.What board members said: Collectively, the school board sounded concerned with secondary students returning full-time in the classroom and cited health experts’ advice that shows that secondary students are at a greater risk for contracting COVID-19, having more severe symptoms and spreading it.Some points that board members and district staff made:Many parents and teachers report that the hybrid learning mode is working for them, while just as many report that it’s not.Several board members opposed making too many abrupt changes to the learning environments without giving students and teachers time to adjust.“While I absolutely agree that people are calling for consistency and wanting that consistency among teachers and staff and families, I have also heard from so many teachers that are about at their breaking point with hybrid, especially at the elementary level. I have actually heard from some teachers who have said that the stress that this is causing them is more of a risk to them than COVID. That concerns me for their mental health and physical well-being.” –Ashley Spaulding, board member“Our kiddos need their teachers and they need that face-to-face time. This is not an ideal situation for anyone, but I would like to just caution us that we’re not going to make everybody happy. When we go back in person… this year, we will see exposure, quarantines, classroom shutdowns, potentially building shutdowns, and we will hear angry, frustrated parents that are trying to find alternatives for their children who are now stuck at home, quarantined for two weeks, we are going to hear from those frustrated families who say why did you change hybrid?” –Danielle Heikes, board presidentTina Darling, a teacher at Starside Elementary, asked the school board to consider the district’s low COVID-19 case count due to the effectiveness of keeping students in remote or hybrid learning.What parents and a teacher said: Parents and teachers gave mixed reactions on the hybrid learning model. Board members said many teachers and parents reported that the hybrid learning mode is working for them. Yet during a public comment period, some sounded exasperated by the start-stop pace of having kids in school only two days a week. One teacher showed support for the hybrid model.“I’m here to tell you this is not working. It doesn’t work to be teacher, mom and employee at the same time. There’s an increase in just hating learning because it’s so hard at home. There’s the frustration, there’s the tears. It’s harming parent-child relationships because of the stress at home.”  –Tracy Buckendorf, parent“There’s all kinds of data to make whatever decision you want to. If you’re going to put our students first, they’ve got to be in the classroom. This is your decision and your time to lead. I hope you push to get every one of our students back in the seat as soon as possible because they’re simply falling behind if they’re not in school.” –Jarrod McGinnis, parent“I know it’s not about the staff, but if you don’t have staff to teach the kids, they’re going to be remote anyway. Just consider that maybe we are doing the right thing and that’s why we have less cases.” –Tina Darling, teacherWhat’s next: The committee will meet on an as-needed basis, possibly in two or three weeks to review the metrics and see whether COVID-19 mitigation efforts such as masks and physical distancing are working. The committee may at that time consider any possible changes to the school district’s learning environment.Meanwhile, the school board will have its regular meeting Monday, Oct. 5.last_img read more

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The Surprising Benefits Of Working Backward

first_imgForbes: The exercise, and its reward, put me in mind of how coming at things backward, awkwardly and in uncertain steps can lead to unanticipated and astonishing breakthroughs. And how discoveries can be made at this intersection of the comedic and the sublime.…The value of this tactic isn’t just the stuff of folk wisdom and unexpected discoveries. Dutch neuroscientists were curious whether different mental processes are employed when we are walking toward something or away from it. Their study, published in Psychological Science in May 2009, found that subjects who walked even a few steps backward were far more focused and attentive than those who didn’t.Read the whole story: Forbeslast_img read more

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Tackling Gender Inequality in STEM? Consider Culture, A New Study Says

first_imgGrowing up in Saudi Arabia, Aciel Eshky didn’t get the memo that science was for boys. When she was around ten years old, her aunt started to teach her basic computer programming. From there, going on to a degree in computer science seemed like a natural fit. So when a classmate in her master’s program abroad told her that women were weaker than men at math, it came as a shock. “I was really annoyed,” Eshky says. “I felt like I was being bullied.”Despite its dismal reputation for gender equality, Saudi Arabia has a surprising level of female graduates in the so-called STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and mathematics). Ranked among the bottom 20 countries in the World Economic Forum’s Global Gender Gap Index in 2015, women nonetheless made up 39% of graduates in a cluster of “core” STEM subjects. This number is higher than Iceland’s 35%, even though the Nordic country ranks number one for gender equality. Norway, which has the second-highest level of gender equity, sees only 26% of women graduating with STEM degrees.Taken together with these numbers, Eshky’s experience is illustrative of the so-called “gender-equality paradox” reported in a recent headline-grabbing paper: Countries ranking higher on measures of gender equality, the study found, tend to have fewer women pursuing a STEM education than those further down the gender equality ranks.Researchers have been reporting paradoxical results like these for years, sparking debate over the best explanation for the counterintuitive findings. For the numerous organisations dedicated to tackling the problem of women’s under-representation in science, the answers could have implications for developing appropriate interventions, and ultimately determining the path to gender equity in countries of vastly different cultural backgrounds. Read the whole story: The Wire More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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New Content From Perspectives on Psychological Science

first_imgThe Reality of “Real-Life” Neuroscience: A Commentary on Shamay-Tsoory and Mendelsohn (2019)Gijs A. Holleman, Ignace T. C. Hooge, Chantal Kemner, and Roy S. HesselsIn this commentary, Holleman and colleagues attempt to clarify the use of the terms “ecological validity” and “representative design.” They argue that Shamay-Tsoory and Mendelsohn (2019) used these terms in a manner different than that originally introduced by Brunswik (1955). Holleman and colleagues explain Brunswick’s original ideas about ecological validity and representative design, which are not necessarily the same. They emphasize that this clarification and the specificity of ecological validity is important because of its contribution to Shamay-Tsoory and Mendelsohn’s ecological approach to understanding human behavior and the brain. Ironic Effects of Thought Suppression: A Meta-AnalysisDeming (Adam) Wang, Martin S. Hagger, and Nikos L. D. ChatzisarantisAfter individuals try to rid their minds of a thought, that thought tends to become more frequent and accessible, ironically, than it does for individuals who deliberately concentrate on the thought. Wang and colleagues present a meta-analysis of 31 studies that tested whether cognitive load (e.g., simultaneously doing other tasks that require cognitive resources) during thought suppression influences ironic effects during and after the suppression. They found that cognitive load impairs one’s capacity for thought suppression. Ironic effects occur during thought suppression in the presence of cognitive load, and ironic effects occur after thought suppression regardless of cognitive load. Where Life Coaching Ends and Therapy Begins: Toward a Less Confusing Treatment LandscapeElias AboujaoudeThe distinction between “life coaching” and psychotherapy is increasingly blurry, raising the possibility of confusion between the two among vulnerable patients, Aboujaoude proposes. He warns against the risks of patients mistaking life coaching for psychotherapy, especially because life coaching does not require education, training, licensing, or supervision for coaches, and because there are no specific legal protections for harmed clients. The author acknowledges that increased access to new forms of help may be positive, but patient safety must be ensured. He advocates for more research on the efficacy and safety of life-coaching practices.center_img The Negative Implications of Being Tolerated: Tolerance From the Target’s PerspectiveMaykel Verkuyten, Kumar Yogeeswaran, and Levi AdelmanWhat are the psychological consequences of being tolerated instead of discriminated? Verkuyten and colleagues provide an overview of these potential consequences for minority members. They argue that being “merely” tolerated leads to social identity threats that may compromise individuals’ psychological needs, such as belonging, esteem, control, and certainty. Threatening these psychological needs influences personal outcomes (e.g., poorer well-being and identity management), interpersonal outcomes (e.g., social costs and withdrawal), and intergroup outcomes (e.g., dismissal of injustices and less engagement in collective action).last_img read more

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Advance Auto Parts Names Brian Dan Vice President, Contract and Real Estate Counsel

first_imgDeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain. ROANOKE, Va. – Advance Auto Parts has appointed Brian Dan as vice president, contract and real estate counsel. Dan will be responsible for overseeing all legal aspects of the company’s commercial contracts and real estate transactions. Dan will report to Sarah Powell, senior vice president, general counsel and corporate secretary, and will be based in Roanoke, Va.AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement “I am excited to have Brian join our legal team,” said Powell. “He is a seasoned, senior-level attorney and business-focused leader who is accomplished and experienced in privacy and compliance, corporate, real estate and commercial law.” Dan most recently served as the founder and principal consultant of Reputation Assurance, a privacy and compliance consulting firm. Prior to that, he served as assistant general counsel at MeadWestvaco; director and assistant general counsel – business and commercial law for Circuit City Stores Inc.; and vice president – real estate law for Office Depot Inc. Dan holds a juris doctor from the University of Miami School of Law, a master of accounting from Florida State University and a bachelor of arts in economics from Tulane University in New Orleans, La.,Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisementlast_img read more

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Governor Signs Modified, Extended Public Health Order Easing Some Restrictions; Requiring Face Coverings

first_imgGov. Michelle Lujan GrishamSTATE News:SANTA FE – Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham on Friday urged New Mexicans to stay the course in the state’s fight against the spread of COVID-19 as a modified emergency public health order eases restrictions on retail operations and requires everyone to wear a cloth face covering in public, among other changes.The new emergency health order, modified to acknowledge incremental progress against the novel coronavirus, takes effect Saturday as the previous order expires; it remains in effect through May 31, when further reopening could occur.The new emergency order, in recognition of increased risk of transmission with additional economic openings, requires everyone to cover their faces in public, with exceptions for eating, drinking and exercise. Reusable cloth face-coverings are easy to make with common household items (see explanatory video here).“I know this is not popular, but seat belts, child safety seats and airbags weren’t popular either when they were first adopted, and we know they save lives,” Gov. Lujan Grisham said. “Please: Wear a mask. It’s compassionate. It protects others, including frontline workers of all types, and we owe them a great debt of gratitude. Let’s protect them and each other and our families.”The extended order, attached to this news release and posted online at cv.nmhealth.org, also allows all retailers, beginning Saturday, to operate at 25 percent of their maximum occupancy as determined by fire code. In the interest of consistency, this now includes larger, “big box” retailers. A retailer is defined as any entity where the end-user or consumer is able to purchase a product within the retail space and does not include theaters, performance spaces, entertainment venues and does not yet include high-intensity contact services like dine-in at restaurants and bars, salons, gyms and tattoo parlors.Houses of worship beginning Saturday may also operate at 25 percent occupancy, according to the public health order, authorized by Health Secretary Kathyleen Kunkel.COVID-SAFE PRACTICES:The emergency public health order mandates compliance with COVID-safe practices, a series of requirements and best practices for businesses and other services – compiled with industry input and the oversight of the governor’s Economic Recovery Council – that will assure the safety of employees and customers. Those COVID-safe practices are available for dissemination and download at cv.nmhealth.org and newmexico.gov and at the link provided here. (The documents include COVID-safe practices for dine-in restaurant services, although those are not yet permissible, in order to allow restaurants and bars and other eateries to prepare for what practices will be required upon a later limited re-opening.)“If New Mexicans don’t help us as we ease restrictions, we’ll see cases rise, and as they rise, we’ll have to shut down again. That’s the only tool I have,’’ the governor said. “If I can’t get New Mexicans to protect vulnerable populations, to protect our seniors and children and minority populations and homeless populations and essential workers and health care workers and first responders and so many more, I will do whatever it takes to protect them. But you can help me. And if we all do this together, we can keep easing restrictions in a safe manner and go on living in a COVID-19 world.”  On May 1, New Mexico State Parks allowed eight state parks to reopen for day use only. As of May 15, as the state continues to evaluate which areas are safe and can be regulated in line with public health needs, the agency has added nine more: Oasis, Oliver Lee, Clayton Lake & Dinosaur Trackways, Pancho Villa, Mesilla Valley Bosque, Living Desert Zoo and Gardens, Coyote Creek, City of Rocks, Rockhound. Before visiting a state park, check www.emnrd.state.nm.us/SPD for hours of operation, visitor capacity guidelines, available facilities and group size restrictions.Motor Vehicle Division field offices will reopen in a limited fashion June 1 with COVID-safe practices for appointment-only services that can’t be completed online — for example, first-time REAL IDs, services for seniors, driving tests and VIN inspections. Early morning appointments will be reserved for seniors. Both employees and customers will wear face coverings. Staff will disinfect vehicles inside and touchpoints outside before and after driving tests/VIN inspections, and both employee and customer will be required to wear face coverings and gloves for those services.  The changes are part of New Mexico’s phased plan for a safe and gradual reopening based on “gating criteria” that show a generally decreasing transmission rate, adequate testing, contact tracing and hospital capacity, and adequate supply of personal protective equipment.The new order moves most of New Mexico from the Preparation Phase to Phase 1 based on small improvements in the transmission rate and the other gating criteria. However, the state continues to see statewide spread of the highly contagious virus. As of Friday, New Mexico had 5,662 reported positive cases and 253 reported fatalities associated with the virus. Two hundred and twenty three New Mexicans remain hospitalized. “As we ease up on some restrictions, to make sure we don’t have another outbreak, everyone needs to wear your mask and keep your distance,” said Dr. David Scrase, Human Services Department secretary.In line with the gating criteria, the amended public health order will again relax several restrictions on low-intensity contact services to relieve additional economic pressure.WHAT REMAINS THE SAME:New Mexicans must remain home except for outings essential for health, safety and welfare, especially elderly and vulnerable individuals. If you must leave home, gatherings of more than five people remain prohibited and 6 feet of physical distance from others must be maintained.Locations and services where high-intensity contact is unavoidable — such as gyms, salons, indoor malls, tattoo parlors and dine-in service at restaurants and bars — remain temporarily closed. Limited in-person operations for those types of businesses could be included in the next modification of the public health order, as soon as early June, depending on New Mexico’s rate of COVID-19 transmission, testing capacity and other gating criteria.Other high-intensity contact services that must remain closed include indoor malls, massage and tattoo parlors, theaters, casinos.A 14-day quarantine order remains in place for out-of-state airport arrivals.Vacation rentals are prohibited to out-of-state residents.Visits to long-term care and other congregate care facilities remain restricted.WHAT WILL CHANGE BEGINNING SATURDAY MAY 16:All retailers may operate according to COVID-Safe Practices (“CSPs”) at 25 percent fire code occupancy. (A “retailer” is any business that sells goods directly to the ultimate consumer or end-users and does not include wholesalers or suppliers, not does it include entertainment venues such as movie theaters, concert halls, or amusement parks);Large retailers like big-box stores and grocery stores may also operate at 25 percent capacity as determined by fire code.Non-essential businesses (other than retailers; such as office spaces, call centers) generally may operate according to CSPs at up to 25 percent of pre-crisis staffing levels. All employees should continue to work from home wherever possible;Houses of worship may operate at 25 percent occupancy;Masks will be required of everyone in public places, with exceptions for eating, drinking and exercising and medical requirements.The mask requirement is based in part on a recent study that found if 80 percent of us adopt a simple homemade face mask, we could reduce deaths from COVID-19 by 17-45 percent over two months, according to Dr. Scrase.“All of us wearing masks could save thousands of lives,” he said.The three counties – McKinley, San Juan and Cibola – in the state’s northwestern public health region that remains a COVID-19 hotspot are exempt from the new order but will be allowed to move into the preparation phase that began two weeks ago for the rest of the state. That means that in those counties, non-essential retailers may provide curb-side pickup or delivery; golf courses, pet and veterinary services may open; and gun stores may operate by appointment. However, the order to stay home except for essential outings remains in place.Assuming continued progress on the gating criteria (reduced transmission rates and adequate capacity for health care and supplies), higher-intensity contact could be phased in when the new order expires. That might include partially reopening salons, barbers, gyms, indoor malls, and dine-in at restaurants with limited occupancy and COVID-safe practices in place. Additionally, occupancy restrictions on houses of worship, motels and hotels could possibly expand in early June.last_img read more

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