Safe driving campaign hits home for Front Row, McDowell

first_imgDAYTONA BEACH, Fla. — Even though he sees triple-digit speeds regularly as a full-time NASCAR driver, Michael McDowell says he often feels safer on the race track than on public roads. Joined by his team and some helpful partners, he’s trying to do something about the latter.Front Row Motorsports announced last week that a collaborative “We Care” effort with ClassicCars.com and the National Road Safety Foundation (NRSF) will raise awareness for safe driving. The message came too close to home for McDowell earlier this week, when his wife, Jami, was involved in a crash Tuesday when another driver ran a red light at an intersection in Concord, North Carolina.MORE: Daytona 500 starting lineupShe emerged sore but otherwise unhurt, but the “We Care” initiative became an even more personal campaign for McDowell.“It’s just a great reminder of how important it is, not only to drive safe but to remember that there’s other families out there,” said McDowell, who started 26th in the Daytona 500 (set to resume on Monday at 4 p.m. ET, FOX, MRN, SiriusXM). “It’s easy to be distracted, especially in the era that we live in with people calling, texting and so much happening and you’re so accessible. Luckily my kids weren’t with her and everybody was able to walk away, but it definitely hits home.” In hopes of offsetting some of the dangers of distracting driving, FRM is taking pledges from motorists to focus on safer travel. McDowell will carry a decal on the side of his No. 34 Ford to amplify the campaign, which has made the message to “leave speeding to the professionals.”“I’m way more comfortable out on the race track than I am on the highway,” McDowell says. “I think that racing in general, we have 40 of the best drivers that there are, so everybody on the race track is doing the same thing, paying attention. Driving a car at 200 mph requires 110 percent focus, so when you get out on the road and people are not paying attention, it’s very frustrating.”last_img read more

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Guru Unveils Dual Mechanical-or-Electronic Cable Stop

first_imgHot on the heels of their move to offer complete bikes, Guru just sent over these renderings of their new patent-pending frame stops for internal routing.The design allows for either mechanical or electronic drivetrains, swapping in cable stops or wire plugs depending on what you’re running. The real beauty of the design is that you can easily upgrade/swap down the road without worrying if your frame is compatible. No doubt it’ll be on their frames (it was shown on their Photon HL at NAHBS, though they didn’t make a big deal about it there), and we’re waiting to hear back if they’ll offer it aftermarket or for other OEM customers. Update as we get it.last_img read more

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Vermont Tech and VYCC to offer alternative college program

first_imgVermont Technical College,Thomas Hark, president and CEO of Vermont Youth Conservation Corps joined Vermont Tech President Dan Smith Thursday in announcing the new Working Lands Certificate Program at the Vermont Farm Show in Essex Junction. Venture Semester, a VYCC and Vermont Tech partnership program, is designed to immerse students in agriculture, food, and leadership, as well as enhance high school graduates’ access to higher education. Dan Smith, left, and Thomas Hark.“I believe fervently that partnerships like this one will be the infrastructure of the next decade.” Said Dan Smith, Vermont Tech’s president. “The future is in finding ways to do more for Vermont and for students with our partners than we can each do alone.”By living, working and learning together, participants earn transferrable college credit and develop critical thinking, advanced writing, and technical skills. Students learn as much about themselves and their place in the world as they do about food systems and agriculture.“The Venture Semester represents an exciting and natural next step in VYCC’s evolution.  We are so excited to be partnering with Vermont Tech, one of Vermont’s premier institutions of higher education.” Said Thomas Hark, the president and CEO of Vermont Youth Conservation Corps. “Students will gain valuable skills in leadership and agriculture while working on one of the most vital issues facing our nation – food security. This is an opportunity for students to truly make a difference.”Forestry, logging, dairy farming, milk processing, vegetable production, animal reproduction, plant science and nutrient management are just some of the concentrations that students are exposed to in this in-depth program. Students leave with hands-on experience, a heightened appreciation of the working landscape and a solid foundation for their future. Agriculture is deeply rooted in Vermont’s past and present. Today, the agriculture industry has about a $4 billion impact on the state’s economy.About Vermont Tech – Vermont Tech is a leading public college with a mission of applied education. One of the five Vermont State Colleges, Vermont Tech serves students from throughout Vermont, New England, and beyond at its two residential campuses in Williston and Randolph Center, regional campuses in Brattleboro and Bennington, and at six nursing campuses located throughout the state. Vermont Tech takes an optimistic, rooted and personal approach to education to support students in gaining the confidence and practical skills necessary to not only see their potential, but to experience it. Our academic programs encompass a wide range of engineering technology, agricultural, health, and business fields that are vital to producing the knowledgeable workers needed most by employers in the state and in the region.  www.vtc.edu(link is external).About Vermont Youth Conservation Corps – The Vermont Youth Conservation Corps is a 501c3 nonprofit service, conservation, and education organization with a mission to teach individuals to take personal responsibility for all their actions. For 29 summers, the VYCC has offered residential service opportunities to youth and young adults seeking meaningful work experiences. Our program model is: small teams, well-trained leaders, and diverse crews working to complete projects that benefit the community. The VYCC instills the values of personal responsibility, hard work, education, and respect for the environment in young people. Corps Members, young adults 16-24, work, live, and learn together in small groups, completing priority conservation and agriculture projects throughout Vermont under the guidance of highly trained leaders.last_img read more

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Darn Tough Vermont continues exceptional growth, adds 100 employees this year

first_imgDarn Tough Vermont,Vermont Business Magazine Continuing its run of significant double-digit growth quarter over quarter,  Darn Tough Vermont(link is external), the American manufacturer of the fastest growing collection of performance outdoor and lifestyle socks, maintains pace for the third quarter of 2015 with an astounding 51 percent year-over-year increase. The increasingly high demand for Darn Tough socks translates to double-digit growth across all categories. Hike/Trek leads with a 59 percent increase followed by Endurance/Running up 52 percent, and Lifestyle up 48 percent. Demand among men has risen 49 percent, 55 percent among women and 46 percent among kids.Demonstrating the brand’s commitment to their ‘Made in Vermont’ label, Darn Tough Vermont continues to invest in people, increasing its workforce by creating 100 jobs in 2015, 39 of which were in the third quarter alone. Growth that is made even more impressive by the Federal Advanced Manufacturing National Program Office’s estimation(link is external) that one new manufacturing position can create up to 1.6 additional local jobs in the service sector.Among the newest key hires is the appointment of Lyn Fienson as Director of Product Design and Development, as well as additions to the customer and dealer service team. This investment in people is combined with investments in infrastructure, ranging from the addition of 40 new state-of-the-art knitting machines to implementing a new training program for manufacturing personnel. Together these advancements will further support the continued demand for Darn Tough socks as they affect all aspects of the business and are already proving successful.“As we look ahead to the year’s fourth quarter, our inventory is strong and the brand is ready to deliver on orders for the upcoming holiday season and colder winter weather months thanks to our continued efforts. As the company continues to focus on streamlining efficiencies we’re celebrating double-digit growth across all categories, all consumer groups, and record-setting job creation here in Vermont,” said Ric Cabot, Darn Tough Vermont president and CEO.About Darn Tough Vermont: Photos by Rick Levinson/RLPhoto courtesy of Darn Tough. Top photo of Ric Cabot.Darn Tough Vermont is an American manufacturer of premium, all-weather outdoor and lifestyle socks with headquarters in Northfield, Vermont. The company offers both Specialty and Tactical product lines. Darn Tough Vermont’s Specialty line offers footwear in six active wear categories including Ski/Ride, Hike/Trek, Run/Bike, Lifestyle, Hunt, Work and Kid’s styles – all of which carry the industry’s only unconditional lifetime guarantee.Darn Tough’s product is distinguished from industry competitors by 100 percent USA manufacturing; fine gauge needle knitting which results in more stitches per inch (1441) and exceptional durability and cushioning; True-Seamless™ technology; and an exclusive blend of either ultra-fine Merino wool or Coolmax®/Thermolite® for comfort, durability and fit and moisture management. Founded by Ric Cabot in 2004, a third-generation sock maker, Darn Tough Vermont operates out of Cabot Hosiery Mills. For more information about Darn Tough Vermont socks, please visit: www.DarnTough.com(link is external). Source: Northfield, Vt. (October 27, 2015) – Darn Toughlast_img read more

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Shawnee police investigate beating of woman, shots fired on Barton Drive

first_imgShawnee police late Thursday night responded to a call of shots fired in the vicinity of 5200 Barton Drive to find a woman lying in the street badly beaten.The call came in to dispatch around 11:20 p.m. When police arrived, they determined that the woman had not been injured by a gunshot, but was suffering serious injuries from a beating. Witnesses at the scene, however, confirmed that a gun had been discharged in the area, though police have not identified any people or property hit by the gunfire.The woman was transported to an area hospital to be treated for her injuries, which police said were not life threatening.Shawnee police continue to investigate the incident, which took place less than a mile to the north of Shawnee City Hall. They say witnesses reported a dark brown Honda Civic leaving the scene of the crime. Anyone with information about the beating and shots fired should contact Shawnee police at 913-742-6873.last_img read more

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Court to consider IOTA rule amendments

first_img Proposed amendments to Bar rules governing how IOTA trust accounts’ proceeds can be used to help low-income Floridians will be taken up by the Supreme Court.The court in recent days created a rules case for the final report and recommended amendments to Bar Rule 5-1.1 submitted by the Task Force on Distribution of IOTA Funds. On October 29, Chief Justice Charles Canady issued an administrative order extending the life of the task force, which had been set to expire at the end of the year, until June 30, 2021.The new order directs the task force to: “(1) file a response to any comments filed with the Court on the proposed rule amendments; (2) participate in oral argument, which may be scheduled in In re: Amendments to Rule Regulating the Florida Bar 5-1.1(g), Case No. SC20-1543; and (3) take whatever other action the Chief Justice may direct.”The new administrative order came one year and five days after the court created the task force and directed it to look at alternative ways to distribute IOTA funds, whether those funds should be earmarked for specified priorities, and whether there should be detailed reporting requirements on the collection and spending of IOTA monies. The court also told the task force to consider whether it should be a priority to spend IOTA funds on direct legal services for low-income Floridians.“I’m very happy. I’m surprised the court was able to get to this quickly,” said former Bar President Mayanne Downs, who chairs the task force. “My impression is the court is interested in moving these matters forward at a reasonably quick rate.”The task force submitted its report and proposed rule amendments on September 15.The Florida Bar Foundation has overseen the IOTA program since its inception almost 40 years ago. Distribution of the funding is controlled by court precedent and the Foundation’s court-approved charter. Operation of IOTA trust accounts and authorization for the program are in Bar Rule 5-1.1(g).The task force at one point considered a rule amendment that would allow agencies other than the Foundation to collect and distribute IOTA funds, but the final rule proposal recommended that the Foundation continue to be the sole conduit for IOTA funds.However, the amendments say administrative overhead should be limited to 15% and funds granted only to experienced charitable or nonprofit organizations that directly provide legal services to the poor. The amendments also say that IOTA funds must be distributed within six months of receipt.The Foundation currently does not spend IOTA funds collected in one fiscal year until the following fiscal year. It has also adopted a funding and reserves policy based on a three-year average of IOTA income and which is designed to prevent the Foundation from ever running out of money.Most Foundation grants fund direct legal services but its charter and Supreme Court precedent also allow it to fiscally support programs that improve the administration of justice.The final rule amendment package was dubbed a “hybrid” that originated from the task force’s original proposals, which included a 5% cap on overhead, and changes suggested by the Foundation and the Florida Civil Legal Aid Association.Downs said the proposed rule amendments will bring more money to direct legal services.“This means we are one step closer to putting millions, potentially, of IOTA dollars to the dedicated use of hiring lawyers to provide direct legal services to Florida’s poor. Every step in that direction is a step I’m happy about,” she said.Former Foundation President Hala Sandridge, who serves on the task force, said previously if the rule changes are ultimately adopted, the Foundation would adapt, including finding other revenue sources for its administration of justice programs and modifying its administrative systems to comply.The Foundation currently does not break down its overhead costs between IOTA and non-IOTA funds, which in the past years has included donations, cy pres awards, and funds allocated from case settlements from the Florida Attorney General’s Office.The latest administrative order directed that the task force’s membership would not change. Besides Downs and Sandridge, other members are Third District Court of Appeal Judge Ed Scales, immediate past Bar President John Stewart, Board of Governors member Laird Lile, Dade Legal Aid: Put Something Back Executive Director Karen Ladis, and Jacksonville attorney M. Scott Thomas. Nov 02, 2020 By Gary Blankenship Senior Editor Top Stories Court to consider IOTA rule amendmentslast_img read more

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Wood Partners to Break Ground on Alta Tempe, 296-Unit Luxury Apartment Building in Tempe

first_imgWood Partners will break ground in early 2014 on Alta Tempe, a 296-unit luxury apartment complex at University Drive and Dorsey Lane near the new Marina Heights, which will be the state’s largest office park when it is completed. Construction of the 270,000-square-foot apartment building, situated on 7.1 acres, should be complete by June 2015. Alta Tempe will begin pre-leasing in third quarter 2014.The contemporary four-story apartment complex, designed by Womack and Hampton, will be built by Wood Partners. It will include 180 one-bedroom units, 104 two-bedroom units and 12 three-bedroom apartments averaging 892 square feet. The units will have granite countertops, upgraded appliances and vinyl plank flooring; entrances will be buffered by conditioned corridors for energy efficiency. Residents will have access to cutting-edge amenities, including a fitness center, resort-style pool, 8,000-square-foot hospitality-style clubhouse with a living wall system (vertical garden), a four-story observation deck with views of Camelback Mountain and all of northern Phoenix, as well as a few other amenities that cannot be disclosed at this time.“Other projects in the area are being constructed at bases 40-60% higher than this development and the rents will reflect this disparity as the value proposition at Alta Tempe will be off the charts,” said Todd Taylor, Phoenix developer for Wood Partners. “Its location near downtown, Arizona State University and the new Marina Heights office development—a big game changer in Tempe—is certainly an important part of the story, and residents will be within walking or biking distance to two metro transit stations.”According to the National Association of Home Builders’ formula to determine the local impact of multifamily housing in typical metro areas, adding nearly 300 rental apartments will generate $23.7 million in local income, $2.5 million in taxes and other revenue for local governments, and 366 local jobs in Tempe.When it is complete in 2017, Marina Heights will include two million square feet of office space and 40,000 square feet of service retail. State Farm Insurance will locate one of its four nationwide operation centers there. Project developers expect the first buildings to be occupied in mid to late 2015.last_img read more

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Shootings and gang violence exposure leads to PTSD

first_imgEmail This is one of very few studies to explicitly examine the impact that living in a disadvantaged neighborhood has on PTSD symptoms. The study was published Dec. 7 in the Journal of Racial and Ethnic Health Disparities.The traumatic experiences reported in the study were often violent or sexual in nature. One woman disclosed having witnessed the fatal shooting of her son, and another woman reported watching her father be murdered in her home.The neighborhood from which women in the study were recruited ranked 7th for property crime, 26th for quality of life crime and 35th for violent crime among 77 Chicago neighborhoods.Thirty-six percent of women in the study had PTSD or sub-threshold PTSD (substantial trauma symptoms that might not have met the full PTSD diagnostic criteria). Those with PTSD had more severe depression symptoms than other women in the study who did not exhibit signs of PTSD, said principal investigator and senior author Inger Burnett-Zeigler, clinical psychologist and assistant professor of psychiatry and behavioral sciences at Feinberg.“Even if you don’t meet the full criteria for PTSD, you can have enough symptoms to impact your well-being,” Burnett-Zeigler said. “There is a substantial proportion of people who fall below the PTSD diagnosis line who might be getting lost in the cracks. It’s important for mental health providers to develop a greater awareness around this because untreated PTSD symptoms affect mental health, quality of life and functioning.”A significant percentage of women in a general population who experienced trauma (20 percent) develop PTSD she said.“But the prevalence of PTSD symptoms is particularly acute in impoverished neighborhoods,” Burnett-Zeigler said. “In the study’s sample, 71 percent of the women who experienced trauma had PTSD symptoms.”“This wasn’t a sample we recruited based on having traumatic experiences, and yet so many women we recruited had experienced something traumatic,” Burnett-Zeigler said. “That is really significant in terms of how prevalent of an issue this is in that vulnerable population.” The violence that women in disadvantaged neighborhoods experience and witness can result in post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) symptoms and full diagnoses, according to a new Northwestern Medicine study that examined a disadvantaged Chicago neighborhood.Also noteworthy, women with PTSD diagnosis or sub-threshold PTSD had significantly more severe depression symptoms than women in the study who didn’t report experiencing trauma. Every woman who was recruited had symptoms of depression.“There are many women who are affected by shooting and gang violence in these neighborhoods,” said first author Sunghyun Hong, a research assistant at Northwestern University Feinberg School of Medicine. “These women are often overlooked. With this study, we were able to shine a light on this high prevalence of trauma exposure and PTSD diagnosis among the underserved population.” Share on Facebook Pinterestcenter_img Share on Twitter LinkedIn Sharelast_img read more

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Referring to yourself in the third-person can help promote healthy food choices

first_imgEmail Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Using your own name in your internal dialogue appears to help with self-control, according to new research published in Clinical Psychological Science. The study found evidence that this type of distanced self-talk can promote healthy food decisions.“Despite having goals to eat healthy, many people have difficulty making healthy choices when tempting foods are directly in front of them,” said Celina Furman of the University of Minnesota, the corresponding author of the new study.“Recent research by Kross and colleagues demonstrated that reflecting on one’s decisions in the third person by using one’s name can be a relatively effortless strategy that improves self-control. Accordingly, we were interested in examining distanced self-talk as a potential strategy to improve eating choices.” LinkedIncenter_img Pinterest Share In the study, 244 young adults disclosed if they were currently dieting or trying to lose weight. The participants were then randomly assigned to watch a two-minute video of health-related commercials that emphasized eating healthy and exercising or home improvement commercials.After watching the video, the participants chose between healthy and unhealthy food items on a computer screen. For each pair of foods, participants were instructed to use either first-person self-talk (“What do I want?”) or distanced self-talk (“[Name], what do you want?”) in a counterbalanced order.The researchers found that non-dieters made fewer unhealthy choices when using distanced self-talk compared to first-person self-talk. Those who viewed the health video also made significantly fewer unhealthy choices when using distanced self-talk regardless of dieting status.“Our findings indicate that reflecting on one’s decisions using one’s own name might enhance one’s ability to follow through with their goals, which can often be undermined by strong situational lures (e.g., tempting foods). This study suggests that this self-distancing technique may improve goal-directed behavior in the context of eating,” Furman told PsyPost.She is now conducting additional research on the self-control strategy.“Follow-up research is exploring mechanisms underlying the beneficial effect of distanced self-talk that we identified in this experiment. Specifically, I am examining not only how distanced self-talk influences eating behavior, but also how it influences the way people mentally represent appetitive stimuli. I am also examining the perceived ease of implementing this strategy when making food-related decisions,” Furman explained.“This minimal approach has implications for eating healthier in our current food environment. As we are regularly confronted with tempting foods, self-control strategies that are easy to implement and can be repeatedly used when encountering those foods are more likely to be effective for improving dietary choices.”The study, “Distanced Self-Talk Enhances Goal Pursuit to Eat Healthier“, was authored by Celina R. Furman, Ethan Kross, and Ashley N. Gearhardt.last_img read more

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Tim Barton Joins Fleet Equipment Staff as Senior Editor

first_imgDeMoulpied comes to LSI from the Private Client Services practice of Ernst & Young where he managed strategy & operations improvement engagements for privately held client businesses. Some of his prior roles include VP of strategic development, director of strategic initiatives, and Lean Six Sigma Master Black Belt at OptumHealth, UnitedHealth Group’s health services business, as well as Lean Six Sigma Black Belt at General Electric, where he applied operations improvement principles to customer service, supply chain and product development. A successful entrepreneur, deMoulpied is also the founder of PrestoFresh, a Cleveland-based e-commerce food/grocery business.  AKRON, OH — Fleet Equipment magazine announced that Tim Barton has joined its staff as senior editor. Barton has more than 20 years experience in the trucking industry working as a journalist and a driver. Recently, he went around the world as part of a journalistic undertaking gathering background and material for a book sponsored by industry suppliers. AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement Barton brings to the job a wealth of knowledge about truck equipment and a well-developed set of journalistic skills. In addition, to having an interest in on-road trucking and equipment, Barton has special interest in truck technology, human interface with technology and government regulations. Fleet Equipment magazine, an industry leading publication focused on managing equipment assets, is published monthly by Babcox Publications, which also publishes aftermarketNews. Tim Barton may be contacted at 330-670-1234 Ext. 203; [email protected],Lubrication Specialties Inc. (LSI), manufacturer of Hot Shot’s Secret brand of performance additives and oils, recently announced the expansion of senior leadership. Steve deMoulpied joins LSI as the company’s chief operating officer (COO). AdvertisementClick Here to Read MoreAdvertisement LSI President Brett Tennar says, “Steve’s success in developing operational strategies that improves the bottom line, builds teamwork, reduces waste and ensures quality product development and distribution checks many of the boxes of what we were looking for in a COO. This, coupled with his career in the Air Force working with highly technical systems and his in-depth understanding of Lean Six Sigma and Business Process Management sealed our offer. As our tagline states, our products are Powered by Science. This data driven approach is one reason why our company has grown exponentially as we employ the most advanced technology to product development. I am confident that Steve is the right person to drive operational strategy for our diverse and growing brands.” Advertisement With more than 20 years of experience across multiple industries and functional areas, deMoulpied has particular expertise in organizations with complex technical products. Combined, his prior positions have required a spectrum of skills in corporate strategy, operations improvement, product quality, and revenue cycle management. He has an impressive history of utilizing data driven problem solving (Lean Six Sigma) and project management (PMP and CSM) to achieve strategic goals surrounding customer satisfaction, operational efficiency and improved profit.  DeMoulpied has a Bachelor of Science degree in Engineering Management from the United States Air Force Academy and a Master of Business Administration degree from the University of Dayton in Marketing and International Business. He served six years with the USAF overseeing the development of technology used on fighter aircraft and the E-3 Surveillance aircraft, finishing his career honorably as Captain.last_img read more

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