New outdoor education resource launched by Green Mountain Club

first_imgThe Green Mountain Club today launched www.LongTrailBound.org(link is external), an innovative outdoor education resource guide and community forum for Vermont educators.â The Green Mountains are a fantastic outdoor classroom and a place for children to explore and learn’said Marge Fish of Londonderry, president of the Green Mountain Club. â The Long Trail Bound resource guide will help educators and youth develop a connection to the mountains and inspire students to become life-long outdoor learners and environmental stewards.âDesigned by a committee of Green Mountain Club volunteers and staff, the Long Trail Bound website will feature twenty activities to be used in the classroom, the home, or on the trail. Topics include teaching outdoor skills, fostering stewardship and sense of place, and teaching about the mountain ecosystem. Wednesdayâ s launch coincided with National Environmental Education Week.Ripton teacher Susan Ogilvie, an educator who has utilized the Long Trail Bound activities, said, â I find the Long Trail Bound guide to be extremely useful in teaching my third and fourth grade students about the Long Trail. The lessons give each hike a focus making them a powerful learning experience.âThe website will serve as a community forum for educators across the state to share experiences, ideas and resources. A list of additional suggested resources and hikes will also be provided.The activities are also being used by Green Mountain Club staff in a series of outdoor education programs with the Montessori School in Montpelier to teach students how to prepare for a hike, nutrition for the trail and map and compass skills. Club staff and volunteers will also continue to utilize these skills and techniques at camps, classrooms and events across the state.The 10,000 member clubâ s mission statement itself explains: â The mission of the Green Mountain Club is to make the Vermont mountains play a larger part in the life of the people by protecting and maintaining the Long Trail system and fostering, through education, the stewardship of Vermont’s hiking trails and mountains.ââ At a time when America fights to get kids outdoors and active, it is a no brainer that we invest in outdoor education both to better steward the land we love and support healthy living,’said Will Wiquist, executive director of the Green Mountain Club.To introduce the guide to educators, the GMC will hold a two-day Long Trail Bound Educator Summit August 14-15 at the clubâ s visitor center in Waterbury Center, VT. Check out the new resource guide at www.longtrailbound.org(link is external).Funding for the Long Trail Bound expansion was generously provided by the Jane B. Cook 1992 Charitable Trust, Harris and Frances Block Foundation, International Paper, Windham Foundation, Oakland Foundation, Patrick Foundation, and the 100on100 Relay.Green Mountain Club. 4.17.2012.last_img read more

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Weekly unemployment claims climb back near 1,000

first_imgWeekly unemployment claims increased in Mid-May for the first time in two weeks. For the week there were 968 new regular benefit claims for Unemployment Insurance in Vermont. This is an increase of 236 claims from the week before, and 63 fewer than last year’s total.Altogether 7,499 new and continuing claims were filed, a decrease of 60 from a week ago and 1,616 fewer than a year ago. The Department also processed 1,418 First Tier claims for benefits under Emergency Unemployment Compensation, 2008 (EUC08), 7 fewer than a week ago. In addition, there were 738 Second Tier claims for benefits processed under the EUC08 program, which is 9 more than the week before. The Unemployment Weekly Report can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/(link is external). Previously released Unemployment Weekly Reports and other UI reports can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/lmipub.htm#uc(link is external)  Vermont’s unemployment rate fell two-tenths to 4.6 percent in April. This is the lowest rate in New England and fourth lowest in the US. See statistics below and story HERE.last_img read more

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Weinberger calls for creation of Airport Strategic Planning Committee, names Gene Richards Interim Director of Aviation

first_imgBurlington International Airport (BTV),Mayor Miro Weinberger today from the mezzanine of Burlington International Airport called for the creation of an Airport Strategic Planning Committee to chart a course for the future success of the Airport.  Weinberger, who served as a member of the Burlington Airport Commission for nine years immediately prior to being elected Mayor, also appointed Gene Richards, the current Chair of the Airport Commission, as the new interim Director of Aviation.  Weinberger asked the City Council both to approve a resolution creating the Airport Strategic Planning Committee and to confirm his appointment of Richards at its July 16, 2012 meeting. ‘The airport is on the path to recovery after some difficult years,’said Weinberger. ‘It is time to create a strategic plan that will continue this improvement and allow the airport to fully realize the opportunities ahead.’ ‘Gene Richards has been a force for change, a person who has driven the improvement of the past 18 months,’said Weinberger.  ‘He is the right person to run the airport until a permanent Aviation Director is named approximately six to nine months from now.’‘I am passionate about the importance of the Burlington International Airport to this region,’said Richards.  ‘The airport has been one of northern Vermont’s economic success stories over the past two decades, and I am excited to play a significant role in keeping it that way.’ Photo: Bob McEwing, Gene Richards, Miro Weinberger, City Councilor Karen Paul, City Councilor Vince DoberMayor’s office, 7.13.2012last_img read more

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GOP official renews demand for independent investigation into Sorrell’s primary campaign

first_imgby Nat Rudarakanchana April 26, 2013 vtdigger.org Vermont GOP chair Jack Lindley has again renewed his request for Vermont Attorney General Bill Sorrell to appoint a special counsel to investigate whether Sorrell broke campaign finance laws during his primary campaign.Lindley sent an open letter on Monday, asking Sorrell to reconsider his prior refusal to appoint such a counsel. Sorrell has consistently maintained that he broke no laws, and didnt illegally co-ordinate his campaign with a Super PAC funded by the Democratic Attorney Generals Association. The Super PAC spent $180,000 on advertising for Sorrell, some of which featured former Gov. Howard Dean, who also campaigned with the attorney general.Aside from a special independent counsel, there is no other practical option for conducting an investigation of a sitting Attorney General in Vermont, reads Lindleys letter.You obviously cannot investigate yourself and none of the other states attorneys has the resources to be able to conduct such an investigation, the letter continues. Therefore, an independent counsel is the only option.In these circumstances, the refusal to appoint an independent counsel will make you effectively immune from justified inquiry and the very legitimacy of your office will be called into question, concludes the letter.In October 2012, when Lindley made his first request, Sorrell suggested he turn to a states attorney. Lindley says it appears that Addison County states attorney David Fenster cant or wont investigate.Fenster told VTDigger said his office is still reviewing the request.None of our offices are structured in such a way where we have a ready staff to engage in these types of investigations, Fenster said. I dont think that means were incapable of doing it, but its outside of our normal duties.Still, Sorrell refuses to reconsider appointing independent counsel. He called doing so a gross waste of $20,000 to $50,000 in taxpayer funds, partly because theres no incriminating evidence to be found, he said.I always thought Republicans were supposed to be fiscally conservative, Sorrell told VTDigger. Its a gross waste of money to have a special prosecutor try to find evidence that doesnt exist. There was no collusion here, no violation of campaign finance laws.He [Lindley] wants me to waste a bunch of taxpayer money and Im not going to do it, continued Sorrell. Its a pathetic attempt on his part to keep a case alive for partisan political reasons, he said.Sorrell pointed out that Jack McMullen had already tried and failed to pursue the same case in a court hearing. A Burlington judge dismissed the case for lack of evidence in late January.McMullen had the opportunity. They had the opportunity to investigate, and they had no evidence to present, said Sorrell. Jack McMullen and his attorney had every right to do discovery, to investigate the evidenceâ ¦They had their day in court, and they lost.They didnt even bother to try to seek answers from me under oath, he continued. They didnt seek to question Howard Dean.Sorrell recently settled with Brian Dubie and the Republican Governors Association over campaign finance litigation, where the state alleged that the Dubie and the RGA were guilty of illegal political co-ordination.Retaining outside counsel for the state isnt unprecedented Sorrell did just that for Vermont Yankee litigation, Lindley said.If states attorneys wanted to investigate campaign finance violations, Sorrell said, they likely have the resources and certainly have the jurisdiction. The question is whether they want to take the time to do it, said Sorrell.A provision in recent campaign finance legislation would have required Sorrell to appoint independent counsel in cases of conflicts of interest. But that section was quietly removed by the Senate Government Operations committee earlier this month.The provision was dropped after assistant attorney general Eve Jacobs-Carnahan said that states attorneys are the natural and appropriate place to turn in cases of conflict of interest.Jacobs-Carnahan said the change would undermine the authority of the judicial branch of government and lead to a situation in which the Legislature micromanages how Sorrell does his job.last_img read more

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VEIC joins the Association for DR & Smart Grid

first_imgThree more leaders in demand response and smart grid have joined the Association for Demand Response and Smart Grid (ADS), the national DR and smart grid organization. They come aboard as ADS, together with other national groups, prepares for next week’s National Summit on Integrating Energy Efficiency and Smart Grid (www.energyefficiencysmartgrid.org(link is external)). The new members are Olivine, Inc, Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC), and EnergyHub.ADS is a non-profit organization based in Washington, DC, that focuses on development and exchange of information among policymakers, utilities, technology companies, and other stakeholders. It includes as members companies and organizations, as well as individuals who consider themselves demand response (DR) and smart grid professionals.”We are excited to have these new members join ADS and help us grow our ability to serve the needs of the DR and smart grid community,” said Dan Delurey, Executive Director of ADS. “Olivine offers a number of options to support DR in the wholesale market, and is also a DR provider and scheduling coordinator. VEIC is a great asset to the discussion on how best to integrate energy efficiency with demand response as they have a strong focus on reducing the overall costs of energy use. And EnergyHub offers in-home options to consumers for reducing their energy using a variety of resources.”We are especially happy to have these new members come on board as we ramp up for the National Summit on Integrating Energy Efficiency and Smart Grid,” said Delurey. “They have already begun to help us as we make final preparations for the event coming up October 15 and 16.” Olivine, Inc. supports responsible demand, by delivering technology, operations, programs, and consulting services in an innovative wrap-around approach to tackle all sides of a problem from regulatory to implementation down to consumer use cases. This approach, part of the Olivine Wayâ ¢, allows Olivine to make a bigger impact by ensuring ultimate value in the projects we undertake. For more information, visit http://olivineinc.com/(link is external).  EnergyHub develops software solutions that allow utilities to operate more effective demand response and energy efficiency programs than ever before. EnergyHub’s Mercury DRMS features utility-grade security and robustness, and it runs on a platform that was built from the ground up for real-time massive data processing. EnergyHub’s Bring Your Own Thermostat℠ service means hundreds of thousands of homes are reachable without the need to roll a single truck. For more information, visithttp://www.energyhub.com/(link is external).Vermont Energy Investment Corporation (VEIC) is dedicated to reducing the economic and environmental costs of energy use. Through its comprehensive energy efficiency utilities and implementation and consulting services, it works with utilities, government agencies, and foundations in the design and delivery of energy efficiency and renewable energy services. VEIC sees electric system planning, market operations, and regulatory policy-making as three interconnected approaches to transforming the energy system. VEIC’s planning engineers specialize in state and regional demand-side planning and understanding the potential of renewable resources. And its program implementation staff uses these studies to develop economic strategies for wholesale power markets. These insights enable VEIC to provide decision-makers with fresh, timely recommendations that are grounded in real-world engineering and economic feasibility. The result is innovative programs, policies, and implementation strategies that promote the highest levels of reliability, affordability, and efficiency. For more information, visit http://www.veic.org/(link is external).About the Association for Demand Response & Smart GridThe Association for Demand Response & Smart Grid (ADS) is a nonprofit organization, originally formed as the Demand Response Coordinating Committee (DRCC) in 2004.  ADS is a 501 (c) 3 nonprofit organization consisting of professionals and organizations involved in demand response and smart grid.  It provides services to meet the needs of its members that help them in the conduct of their work and in the attainment of their personal, corporate and governmental objectives.  ADS seeks to establish and grow a demand response “community” of policymakers, utilities, system operators, technology companies, consumers, and other stakeholders.Group Members of ADS are Ameren, American Public Power Association, Arizona Public Service, California ISO, Comverge, Con Edison, Conservation Services Group, Constellation, Corporate Systems Engineering, Dimplex, Duke Energy, Emerson Climate Technologies, ENBALA, Energate, EnergyHub, EnerNOC, Freeman, Sullivan & Co, GE, ISO New England, Landis+Gyr, MISO, National Grid, National Rural Electric Cooperative Association, Navigant Energy Practice, Negawatt, NYSERDA, Olivine, Inc., On-Ramp Wireless, OPower, Pacific Gas & Electric, PECO, PJM Interconnection, Reliant, Rodan Energy Solutions, Inc., San Diego Gas & Electric, Siemens, Silver Spring Networks, Southern California Edison, Southern Company, Steffes Corporation, Tennessee Valley Authority, Vermont Energy Investment Corporation.    More information on ADS can be found at: www.demandresponsesmartgrid.org(link is external)SOURCE WASHINGTON, Oct. 7, 2013 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ — Association for Demand Response & Smart Gridlast_img read more

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US Solar Testing Center launched in Vermont at IBM campus

first_imgUS Senator Bernie Sanders (I-VT) and Vermont Governor Peter Shumlin joined representatives of IBM, Sandia National Laboratories and the US Department of Energy to launch the Vermont Photovoltaic Regional Test Center on the IBM campus in Williston. The center will research ways to cut the cost of solar power and integrate solar energy into Vermont’s statewide smart grid.’ The Regional Test Center is a $3 million project funded by the US Department of Energy’s SunShot Initiative, which aims to reduce the cost of solar energy by 75 percent by 2020 and make solar power account for at least 15 percent of America’s electricity generation by 2030.’ ‘ The Regional Test Center is one of five such facilities in the United States and will provide critical performance data on solar photovoltaic systems, including determining the effectiveness of operating in a climate with harsh winters, significant precipitation and dramatic weather changes.’ ‘We have a bold vision here in Vermont and across the country for an energy transformation phasing fossil fuels out as quickly as possible in favor of clean, renewable energy. Solar energy is a central part of that vision,’ said Sanders, who serves on the Senate energy and environment committees. ‘People understand that solar has huge potential to reduce greenhouse gas emissions and create good jobs.’ (Click here for the Sanders’ prepared remarks.)’ Sanders, clearly frigid on a cold, bright and breezy day, led the effort to site the facility in Vermont. The solar collectors, meanwhile, will not mind low temperatures. Photovoltaic panels are more efficient under colder conditions.‘With Vermont No. 1 per capita in private-sector green jobs and ninth in the nation in solar energy installations, the Department of Energy picked our state to host a regional solar test center,’ Governor Peter Shumlin said. ‘I am so proud that, through the efforts of Sen. Sanders and with partners like Sandia National Laboratories and IBM Essex, Vermont, will be playing a leading role in critical research and development to advance clean solar power.’’ ‘ The seven-acre testing site is on IBM-owned land in Williston and will accommodate up to 300 kilowatts of solar power. Construction of the facility will continue throughout the fall.’ Solar manufacturers, selected by a competitive process, will install photovoltaic systems at the Regional Test Center where they will be rigorously monitored by Sandia for performance and reliability. The testing site also will support collaborative research on integration of solar technologies into Vermont’s statewide smart electric grid, built with $69 million in federal funds and matching contributions from the state’s utilities.’ ‘Thanks to the vision of Senator Sanders, the leadership of the Department of Energy and technical commitment from IBM, this Regional Test Center will help realize a national vision for research, demonstration and testing of cutting edge solar technology,” said Steve Rottler, Sandia National Laboratories Vice President. ‘ ‘ ‘This program brings together the unique skills and resources at IBM Vermont with Sandia to address how to improve the cost and efficiency of solar energy,’ said Janette Bombardier, senior location executive for IBM in Vermont. ‘The development and expanded use of alternative energy sources is a key goal for Vermont and the nation, and IBM’s smart electrical grid, technical expertise, data management experience, and regional partners make IBM Vermont the right location to achieve the goals of the SunShot initiative.’The Regional Test Center is a collaborative effort, funded by the US Department of Energy, led by Sandia National Laboratories, and hosted by IBM with support provided by Green Mountain Power, the University of Vermont, and the State of Vermont.‘The goal is to see Vermont at the cutting-edge in research and development of solar energy,’ Sanders said.WILLISTON, Vt., Nov. 4, 2013last_img read more

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US Treasury Dept issues Flexible Capital Fund CDFI certification

first_imgThe US Department of the Treasury’s Community Development Financial Institutions Fund (CDFI Fund) has certified the Flexible Capital Fund, L3C, ased in Montpelier, as a Community Development Financial Institution (CDFI). CDFI certification means that an organization meets the following requirements: has a primary mission of promoting community development; predominantly serves eligible target markets; and is a financing entity that provides development services.‘The CDFI certification validates our investment fund as a mission-based funder focused on community development,’ says Janice St. Onge, president of the Flexible Capital Fund. ‘Certification allows the Flex Fund to apply for grant and equity capital through the US Treasury’s CDFI Fund. If successful in application, these funds could help us reach our capitalization goal of $4.0 million, provide loan loss reserve funding (critical to reducing our portfolio risk), and help us raise additional funds to provide critical technical assistance in support of our portfolio companies.’’ The Flex Fund currently has investments in Vermont Smoke and Cure in Hinesburg, Farmers To You in Berlin, Aegis Renewable Energy in Waitsfield, Liz Lovely Cookies in Waitsfield, and The Vermont Butcher Block and Board Company in Williston.’ ‘ ‘Certification as a CDFI is also attractive to prospective accredited investors who are looking for not only a financial, but also social returns. In addition to now being able to seek federal funding, we believe certification will help us to attract additional private investment as well,’ St. Onge adds.The Flex Fund joins the ranks of other CDFI certified lending institutions in Vermont including the Vermont Community Loan Fund, Northern Community Investment Corp., Community Capital of Vermont, Opportunities Credit Union, and Rutland West Neighborhood Housing Services.’ ‘ The’ Flexible Capital Fund, L3C’ is a mission-based investment fund that provides ‘equity-like’ financing in the form of royalty loans and subordinated debt to targeted Vermont growth companies in value-added agriculture, forest products, renewable energy, and waste management. Flex Fund investments are combined with business assistance to ensure borrowers have the support they need to stay and grow in Vermont. As a Vermont Licensed Lender, the Flex Fund is the first business lending program in Vermont focused on providing royalty financing for growth stage businesses’and one of only two such programs of its scale in New England. With royalty financing, instead of taking a piece of ownership in the company, a lender provides debt that the company repays by sharing a piece of their gross revenue over a fixed period of time. The Flex Fund’s innovative royalty/revenue-based financing allows for income and upside to investors while preserving ownership and mission with founding entrepreneurs.’ www.vsjf.org/what-we-do/flexible-capital-fund(link is external)’ www.facebook.com/flexfund(link is external)last_img read more

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Vermont House and Senate have big work to do in six days

first_imgby Anne Galloway vtdigger.org(link is external) Dozens of key pieces of legislation are still pending as the Legislature approaches May 10, the deadline set by House Speaker Shap Smith. The Vermont House and Senate have yet to concur on a number of important bills, and others haven’t yet passed in one body or the other. A few of the biggies at the end include school district consolidation, the miscellaneous tax bill, the budget, several union bills and teachers’ retiree health care. The two bodies have agreed to several key pieces of legislation — including the the omnibus transportation budget, the lift of a cap on local solar generation, a new primary election date set for the second Tuesday in August 2016 and a bill that requires food manufacturers to label genetically modified ingredients.Still, much remains to be resolved in the next five to six days. A number of bills haven’t yet made it to the joint House and Senate conference committees, including the must-pass miscellaneous tax bill, which includes a property tax rate increase and a tax hike on large employers that don’t offer health insurance, the opiate treatment bill (also known as the pretrial services initiative which would divert addicts into treatment), and a proposal that sets new standards for apprehending “drugged” drivers.The sleeper issues that have come to life in the waning days of the session include changes to the current use program,(link is external) a workers comp overhaul, legislation that would allow home childcare workers to unionize (the Senate passed the bill earlier this session), a ban on cellphone use while driving, and a miscellaneous education bill that includes incentives for school district consolidation that will be taken up by the Senate Finance Committee on Monday.The last stop for many bills will be the Senate, and that means there will be several late nights this week in the Green Room. Senate President Pro Tem John Campbell announced on Friday that if senators couldn’t finish the daily calendar by late afternoon, the body would meet between 6:30 and 8 p.m. every evening this week.Here are a few of the outstanding areas of disagreement between the House and Senate that will be resolved in conference committee:BudgetThe House reduced the governor’s recommended 2 percent increase in Medicaid reimbursement payments to 0.75 percent. The Senate reinstated the 2 percent level.The House agreed with the governor’s 1 percent increase for higher education for the second half of the fiscal year. Senate diverted the $400,000 into a VSAC program for high school students.The Shumlin administration has agreed to increase pay for home health care workers. The new cost, $2.2 million, is not included in the budget, according to a report from Vermont Public Radio. (link is external)Where the money will come from has not yet been determined.TaxThe Shumlin administration pitched a $14 million claims assessment and $30 million in one-time money to help fund an overall budget increase of 5 percent. The governor’s office recommended a property tax rate increase of 7 cents; $1.01 for homestead and $1.51 for non-residential taxpayers.The House brought spending down and needed about $1.2 million to balance the budget. Lawmakers raised $500,000 through a new tax on e-cigarettes and an increase in the tax on snuff for about $900,000.Property tax rates for homestead rate payers would go up 4 cents under the House proposal; non-residential rates increase 7.5 cents. The House used $16 million in one-time reserve monies to bring the residential rate down. The House also included a pha搜索引擎优化ut of the $7.7 million small schools grant and an excess spending threshold mechanism that is tied to inflation.The Senate uses a tiered hike in the assessment on companies that do not offer health insurance for workers, or that offer a benefit but pay so little that workers opt to go on Medicaid. The so-called employer assessment raises $3.6 million. The Senate dropped the e-cigarette tax and kept the increase on snuff.Property tax rates under the Senate proposal look more like the governor’s recommendation. Instead of using one-time funds, the Senate raises the rate for residential property tax payers by 6 cents and the rate for non-residential (rental, commercial and second home property owners) by 7 cents.Minimum wageIn Vermont the wage threshold is currently $8.73 per hour.The Shumlin administration proposed a phased-in minimum wage increase over a three-year period, eventually bringing the rate to $10.10.The House proposal raises the minimum wage by $10.10 Jan. 1, 2015.The Senate has a four-year, tiered phased in increase: $9.15 by Jan. 1, 2015; $9.60 in 2016; $10 in 2017 and $10.50 by 2018.last_img read more

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Ron Cioffi named Rutland Chamber Business Person of the Year

first_imgThe Rutland Region Chamber of Commerce announced on October 29, 2014 at their Annual Meeting (sponsored by GE-Avaiation) that Ron Cioffi (Executive Director and Chief Executive Officer) at Rutland Area Visiting Nurse Association & Hospice is the Chamber’s 2014 Business Person of the Year. Cioffi was presented the award by Congressman Peter Welch, Rutland City Mayor Chris Louras, and Chamber officials. Tom Donahue (Executive Vice President/CEO) of the Chamber, called Cioffi “a tireless advocate for community health.” In 2013 RAVNAH served 2.589 clients making 92,168 visits to residents in Rutland County. A major employer, Rutland Area Visiting Nurse Association (RAVNAH) employs 342 people with 287 in Rutland and another 55 in Bennington, due to the recent merger with Bennington’s VNA which on October 1 became part of the larger RAVNAH family.Ron Cioffi, Executive Director and CEO at RAVNAH receives the Business Person of the Year Award from Chamber EVP/CEO Tom Donahue, Chamber President Dave Correll, Congressman Peter Welch and Rutland City Mayor Chris Louras. Photo by Christopher ThayerDonahue gave a brief presentation on the Chamber’s accomplishments over the past year and upcoming projects including the 2nd Annual Vermont Gift Show & Craft Fair sponsored by Vermont Country Store on November 22nd and the Chamber’s new web page to be launched in December.The Keynote Speaker for the meeting (attended by over 200 people) was motivational speaker Ross Gibson from The Richards Group.  Gibson spoke about Leadership.last_img read more

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Vermont Tech and VYCC to offer alternative college program

first_imgVermont Technical College,Thomas Hark, president and CEO of Vermont Youth Conservation Corps joined Vermont Tech President Dan Smith Thursday in announcing the new Working Lands Certificate Program at the Vermont Farm Show in Essex Junction. Venture Semester, a VYCC and Vermont Tech partnership program, is designed to immerse students in agriculture, food, and leadership, as well as enhance high school graduates’ access to higher education. Dan Smith, left, and Thomas Hark.“I believe fervently that partnerships like this one will be the infrastructure of the next decade.” Said Dan Smith, Vermont Tech’s president. “The future is in finding ways to do more for Vermont and for students with our partners than we can each do alone.”By living, working and learning together, participants earn transferrable college credit and develop critical thinking, advanced writing, and technical skills. Students learn as much about themselves and their place in the world as they do about food systems and agriculture.“The Venture Semester represents an exciting and natural next step in VYCC’s evolution.  We are so excited to be partnering with Vermont Tech, one of Vermont’s premier institutions of higher education.” Said Thomas Hark, the president and CEO of Vermont Youth Conservation Corps. “Students will gain valuable skills in leadership and agriculture while working on one of the most vital issues facing our nation – food security. This is an opportunity for students to truly make a difference.”Forestry, logging, dairy farming, milk processing, vegetable production, animal reproduction, plant science and nutrient management are just some of the concentrations that students are exposed to in this in-depth program. Students leave with hands-on experience, a heightened appreciation of the working landscape and a solid foundation for their future. Agriculture is deeply rooted in Vermont’s past and present. Today, the agriculture industry has about a $4 billion impact on the state’s economy.About Vermont Tech – Vermont Tech is a leading public college with a mission of applied education. One of the five Vermont State Colleges, Vermont Tech serves students from throughout Vermont, New England, and beyond at its two residential campuses in Williston and Randolph Center, regional campuses in Brattleboro and Bennington, and at six nursing campuses located throughout the state. Vermont Tech takes an optimistic, rooted and personal approach to education to support students in gaining the confidence and practical skills necessary to not only see their potential, but to experience it. Our academic programs encompass a wide range of engineering technology, agricultural, health, and business fields that are vital to producing the knowledgeable workers needed most by employers in the state and in the region.  www.vtc.edu(link is external).About Vermont Youth Conservation Corps – The Vermont Youth Conservation Corps is a 501c3 nonprofit service, conservation, and education organization with a mission to teach individuals to take personal responsibility for all their actions. For 29 summers, the VYCC has offered residential service opportunities to youth and young adults seeking meaningful work experiences. Our program model is: small teams, well-trained leaders, and diverse crews working to complete projects that benefit the community. The VYCC instills the values of personal responsibility, hard work, education, and respect for the environment in young people. Corps Members, young adults 16-24, work, live, and learn together in small groups, completing priority conservation and agriculture projects throughout Vermont under the guidance of highly trained leaders.last_img read more

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