War is hell, but AIDS remains our deadliest foe

first_imgDarfur is headline news – but actually, the worst humanitarian crisis in the world today is in southern Africa. I mean it. While the devastating effects of the three-year drought now appear to be receding, southern Africa is still crippled by a blight of cataclysmic proportions – the HIV/AIDS pandemic.So far, around a million people have died. This is the tip of the iceberg: with as many as one in three adults in some countries infected with the HIV virus, the deaths can only increase. There are already 11 million AIDS orphans in southern Africa; by 2010, this number is expected to swell to 20m. Imagine every child under five in France, Germany, Italy, Poland, Spain and the United Kingdom losing their parents and you begin to get the picture.One of the worst aspects of HIV/AIDS is that it hits people at the most productive stage of their lives. Southern Africa is now losing teachers, doctors and civil servants at a faster rate than it can train them. The effect this has on social services is obviously devastating. In Africa as a whole, seven million farmers have so far died of AIDS – a much more lethal blow to agricultural production than any drought.Horrific as these statistics are, they do not seem to impress donors as much as the short-term, high-profile crises caused by conflict or natural disasters. There is, for understandable reasons, something of a fire-brigade mentality among donors. A big conflagration – such as Darfur – attracts generous donations. But getting funds for a long, smouldering, but far more destructive fire is a considerably more challenging task.So why is this so important for WFP? Because food aid can make a huge difference. For most people living with HIV/AIDS, drugs are still not available or affordable. But in the battle against HIV/AIDS, good nutrition can prolong their lives and keep them active and producing. And even for those fortunate enough to have access to anti-retroviral drugs, the medicine works better for the well nourished.There is also the fact that even in areas with the highest HIV prevalence, the vast majority of children between the ages of five and 15 are free of the virus. We need to do everything in our power to keep them that way. And while scientists continue to search for a vaccine and a cure for AIDS, the best hope we currently have is to keep children in school as long as possible. A recent World Bank study showed that young people with little or no education were twice as likely to contract HIV as those with a primary school education. The study also found that in comparison to children who do not go to school, those with an education were more likely to respond to HIV prevention campaigns and thus more likely to change behaviour that puts them at risk of contracting HIV. This is not to say that it is not serious – I saw for myself the horrendous plight of some two million people forced out of their homes, their livelihoods destroyed, women raped and whole families butchered. This dreadful injustice has rightly attracted the attention of the international press and world leaders.And WFP is there. So far, we are trucking and airlifting food aid to some 300,000 internally displaced people in the Darfur region and more than 100,000 refugees across the border in Chad. center_img There is, unfortunately, a tendency in some quarters to see Africa’s struggle with HIV/AIDS as “not our problem”. But we may soon encounter what amounts to societal meltdown. You can already see it in rural areas whose small communities are being abandoned and fields lie fallow. Children are raising other children and they are all lost and hungry.I therefore have one crucial message to our already generous donors and in particular to the newly expanded and booming European Union: thank you for the big donations for the emergencies that we all see on the evening news. But it is even more important to invest now in warding off this millennium’s most deadly scourge, before it is too late.James Morris is the executive director of the United Nations World Food Programme and the UN secretary-general’s special envoy for southern Africa.last_img read more

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Benchmarks seminars slated for the Bar’s September meeting in Tampa

first_img Benchmarks seminars slated for the Bar’s September meeting in Tampa T wo seminars to teach attorneys how to talk to civic groups about concepts such as the rule of law, judicial review, and election of judges will be held at The Florida Bar Fall Meeting in Tampa.Annette Pitts, executive director of The Florida Law Related Education Association, will lead the seminars, which are interactive. The sessions will be held September 27, from 1 to 2 p.m. and 2:30 to 3:30 p.m. at the Tampa Airport Marriott. Registration is free. Register by emailing or calling Susannah Lyle at [email protected] or (850) 561-5669. Each session is approved for one hour of general CLE credit. The Florida Bar’s “Benchmarks: Raising the Bar on Civics Education” program offers attorneys presentations to use when they speak to adult civic and community groups. Attorneys can sign up to give presentations through The Florida Bar Speakers Bureau and groups can make requests for speakers through the same online resource.Florida Bar President Eugene Pettis chaired the Bar committee that developed the Benchmarks program and is championing it now. He is asking voluntary bar associations to incorporate a Benchmarks initiative into their agendas.“Let’s have one program we do that we have in common,” said Pettis, “And this year, let it be Benchmarks. If we can come together on that, I think it will go a long way on what should be continuous education of the principles we talked so readily about in The Vote’s in YOUR COURT campaign.”Pettis was referring to the Bar’s education efforts in 2012 when three Florida Supreme Court justices faced merit retention votes and were targeted by special interest groups.“I don’t think it should be a conversation that takes place only during crisis times,” he added.Each Benchmarks presentation has an overview and supporting materials developed by Pitts working with the Constitutional Judiciary Committee. Benchmarks presentations cover:* “ How to Judge Judicial Candidates,” which focuses on trial court judges, explaining how judges are different from other elected officials. Audience members are asked to consider the indicators that they use when choosing judges. The presentation offers information on how to evaluate judges and ways of finding additional information. * “Judge for Yourself ” focuses on merit selection and retention of judges for Florida’s appellate courts and Supreme Court. It reviews the extensive screening process used in Florida in selecting appellate judges. * “Amending Florida’s Constitution” examines the limited role of the courts in reviewing proposed constitutional amendments – whether the ballot initiatives come from citizens or lawmakers. Participants review proposed ballot initiatives and decide whether they should go before voters. * “Could You Pass the Test?” tests participants’ knowledge of the U.S. and Florida constitutions. Some of the questions are taken from the U.S. citizenship test. * “Is It Unconstitutional? The Case of the Scarlet Tag” asks audience members to consider a fictitious state statute that would require those convicted of DUIs to have scarlet-colored license plates. Participants examine the statute in terms of the Bill of Rights and constitutionality, and in the process learn about judicial review. * “What the Law Means” explains what the U.S. Constitution says about the courts. Audience members consider specific phrases, such as “cruel and unusual punishment,” which are open to interpretation, and others that are not, such as the minimum age for a person to be a presidential candidate. * “Beyond Labels: Exploring the Meaning of Judicial Independence” looks at the way labels are used to explain judicial decisions — and asks participants to write down “good” labels and “bad” ones. Participants discuss the meaning and importance of judicial independence.Benchmarks overviews and supporting materials can be downloaded from The Florida Bar website at www.floridabar.org/judicialindependence. CLE credits are available for making presentations. Attorneys who make Benchmarks presentations can receive one hour of ethics credit for up to three hours in a three-year reporting cycle. September 15, 2013 Regular News Benchmarks seminars slated for the Bar’s September meeting in Tampalast_img read more

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Negrense trackster Delotavo nabs silver in Arafura Games

first_imgDelivering golds in men’s athletics were Nicko Caparoso (3,000-meter steeplechase), Bruce Fernia (javelin throw), John Lloyd Cabalo (400-meter run), Mark Anthony Casena (triple jump), and the men’s 4×100-meter relay of Jovanie Calixto, Romel Bautista, Jason Buenacosa and Cabalo.In swimming, Lora Micah Amogius became the first double gold medalist for the Philippines after bagging the 13-14 100-meter backstroke and the 200-meter individual medley, while Ivo Nikolai Enot won the men’s 13-14 100-meter backstroke gold.Kaitlyn Irisha Mahril Diaz, meanwhile, delivered a silver medal for the Philippine delegation after placing second in the women’s -45 kilogram weightlifting competition./PN Ara Rahbea Delotavo MANILA – Negrense Ara Rahbea Delotavo clinched a silver medal as part of Philippine relay team in the athletics event of the 2019 Arafura Games on Saturday in Darwin, Australia.Delotavo, a product of Bacolod Tay Tung High School Thunderbolts, joined Evangelene Caminong, Jessel Lumapas, and Eliza Cuyom in placing second behind Malaysia in the 4×100-meter relay.The silver medal, however, was just one of the many medals the Philippine delegation won in the first day of the tournament, which is making a return for the first time since 2011.Lumapas also got a gold medal in the women’s 400-meter run, as well as Abigail Manzano in the women’s 3,000-meter steeplechase.last_img read more

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‘Cave in’ slows traffic on Padre

first_img RelatedBurst pipe: LMWD issues area wide-boil noticeBy Gaige Davila Port Isabel-South Padre Press   This story has been updated. Workers from an unnamed utility company broke a main water line on the 700 block of Padre Boulevard around 3:00 p.m. on Tuesday, July 23, according to Nikki Soto, public information officer for the City of South…July 26, 2019In “News”Water main ruptures, damages streetBy DINA ARÉVALO Port Isabel-South Padre Press [email protected] A 16 inch water pipe ruptured, causing damage to a recently reopened stretch of Sunset Drive on the north end of South Padre Island Monday. The rupture occurred while a Time Warner Cable (TWC) employee was attempting to bore underneath the street to…November 13, 2015In “News”Cantu appointed to LMWD boardBy ESTEVAN MEDRANO and DINA ARÉVALO Port Isabel-South Padre Press [email protected] The Laguna Madre Water District welcomed their newest board member Martin Cantu Jr., who was appointed and sworn in Feb. 11 as the replacement for Nancy Martinez. Martin, a product of the University of Texas at Brownsville, was selected among…March 8, 2015In “News” By DINA ARÉVALOPort Isabel-South Padre [email protected] broken sewer line is suspected to have caused a small cave-in of the road surface of Padre Boulevard, said Laguna Madre Water District General Manager Carlos Galvan.Galvan was notified about the hole that had formed in the northbound lanes at the intersection of Padre Boulevard and State Park Road 100 after 6 p.m. Wednesday, he said.“There’s a small cave in – not a big one – but we’ve got to take care of it,” he said. “It’s not that deep, but it could get deeper.”Barriers had been erected around the hole and traffic had been diverted around the area by Wednesday night, but repairs hinged upon knowing where nearby utilities were, Galvan said. “We’re going to have to wait for utility spotters to tell us where all utilities are at,” Galvan said. Those utilities include electrical, cable and telephone lines.“It looks like there’s a broken sewer line in there,” he said, but explained that workers would still have to investigate to make sure.“We’re going to take the asphalt out of the way and open the manhole and look into it and see if there’s anything broken close to the manhole,” Galvan said. “If not, we’re just going to dig the lines around it and see what’s connected to it and see what’s broken,” he said.Once the source of the problem is identified, crews will work to repair the issue, then fill in the hole. “Once we fix the crack, or broken line, we’ll cover it back up,” Galvan said. The hole will be filled, first with river sand, then cement stabilizer, then caliche and finally asphalt, Galvan explained. He added that the asphalt won’t be added until about a week after repairs are made. The filler materials will need time to settle before asphalt can be laid, he said. Drivers will still be able to use the lane once the caliche is in place, though.Galvan was hopeful that the issue could be addressed overnight, while the tide remained low and before daytime traffic could be impacted. “(We’re) hoping that the low tide now, right now, will help us, because when it’s high tide you get a lot of water infiltration from the sea,” he said. The water table is between three to four feet, he said.“Looks like, hopefully, we can tackle it tonight before the traffic comes in the morning,” he said. The area remained blocked off as of Thursday morning.Want the whole story? Pick up a copy of the Port Isabel-South Padre Press, or subscribe to our E-Edition by clicking here. Sharelast_img read more

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Gallery: Hartpury 24-61 Bristol Rugby

first_imgBristol led narrowly at the interval, but an explosive second period saw the visitors seal a convincing win at the Gillman’s Ground.Images courtesy of JMPUK.last_img

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AB breaks silence on World Cup storm: ‘Criticism is unjustified’

first_imgAB de Villiers has finally delivered his version of events following last month’s media storm over his alleged last-ditch attempt to play in this year’s World Cup.Details of the Proteas legend’s desire to come out of international retirement on the eve of South Africa’s official squad announcement emerged after the team’s loss to India in Southampton, heaping pressure on a side already dogged by a poor start to the tournament.In a statement released on Friday, the 35-year-old doesn’t deny that he casually kept hopes of a comeback alive, but reiterates that he never demanded consideration.ALSO READ: UPDATE: Proteas confirm AB’s World Cup offer was turned down“I certainly didn’t try to force my way into the World Cup squad on the eve of the tournament, and didn’t expect to be included. There was no burning issue from my side, and no sense of injustice,” said De Villiers.“On the day of my (retirement) announcement (in May 2018), I was privately asked whether ‘the door was still open’ for me to play in the World Cup. I was asked. I did not offer. I quickly replied ‘Yes’. With hindsight, maybe I should have just said no, but my natural instinct has always been to find a way to oblige whenever possible.“During the weeks and months that followed, there was no formal contact between Cricket South Africa or the Proteas and me. I didn’t call them, and they didn’t call me. I had made my decision and the Proteas moved on. I had been in decent form during the Indian Premier League and casually repeated what I had said when asked a year earlier, that I was available if required… but only if required. I made absolutely no demands at all.”De Villiers blames “elements” for leaking and framing the story out of context.ALSO READ: AB mistimed his retirement, says Ottis“The story was not leaked by me, or anybody associated with me, or by Faf. Maybe someone wanted to deflect criticism. I don’t know.“As a result, I was unfairly described as arrogant, selfish and indecisive but, with all humility, my conscience is clear.”The former Proteas skipper also added that he and childhood friend Du Plessis remain on good terms and that he’ll continue to support the national team unconditionally.For more sport your way, download The Citizen’s app for iOS and Android.last_img read more

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