Lettuce & The Motet Members Interpret Jaco Pastorius With “Teen Town” At Democracy Comes Alive [Watch]

first_imgOn Saturday, October 3rd, members of fan-favorite funk outfits Lettuce and The Motet teamed up for a special collaboration at Democracy Comes Alive, a one-day, nonpartisan virtual music festival aimed at channeling the power of music to make a critical impact on civic engagement in this November’s elections and beyond. Lettuce’s Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff (guitar) and Adam Deitch (drums) linked up with The Motet’s Garrett Sayers (bass) and Joey Porter (keys) in Colorado for a take on Weather Report‘s jazz fusion classic, “Teen Town”.Related: Joey Porter Plays All The Parts, Gets His Daughter & Nigel Hall Involved At Democracy Comes Alive [Watch]The mere mention of “Teen Town” evokes images of the late, great bassist Jaco Pastorius, who wrote the song for Weather Report’s 1977 LP, Heavy Weather, and played both bass and drums on the track. Despite the challenge of covering one of the greatest players in history, Sayers and Deitch rose to the occasion, providing continuous opportunities for Joe Zawinul-style interplay from Porter. Though Wayne Shorter‘s soprano sax parts were not represented in this quartet formation, Smirnoff expertly filled the space with his rhythmic guitar shuffle and mirrored lead melodies.Watch members of Lettuce and The Motet take on “Teen Town” at Democracy Comes Alive below, recorded by Colin McKinley/Alpine Music Photo. If you enjoyed the performance and have the means, consider making a donation to HeadCount and the Democracy Comes Alive artists via DemocracyComesAlive.com.Lettuce x The Motet Members – “Teen Town” (Weather Report) – Democracy Comes AliveThese players have all been staples of Live For Live Music’s virtual music festivals throughout the year, contributing performances to Quarantine Comes Alive and Justice Comes Alive as well as Democracy Comes Alive.This Lettuce/Motet crossover joined 50+ performers and 10+ other speakers as part of Democracy Comes Alive, presented by Live For Live Music in partnership with voter registration nonprofit HeadCount. The 10-hour streaming event, powered by Nugs.TV and Plus 1, generated $40,000 and counting in funds for HeadCount as well as the participating artists, who remain out of work as the pandemic continues. In addition to the funds generated, Democracy Comes Alive led thousands of people to HeadCount’s tools to check your voter registration status and register to vote. For more information, head here.last_img read more

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Recovery Begins after Storms Kill 11 in Midwest, South

first_imgIn northwestern Louisiana, three fatalities were blamed on high winds. A man in his bed in Oil City, Louisiana, was crushed to death by a tree that fell on his home early Saturday. A couple in nearby Bossier Parish were killed when the storms demolished their mobile home. The National Weather Service said a tornado with 135 mph (215 kph) winds hit the area. Tens of thousands remained without electrical power Sunday as a result of the storms a day earlier. Officials in far-flung locations were assessing the damages while utility crews worked to restore power. Entergy Corporation, said its subsidiaries serving Arkansas, Louisiana, Texas and Mississippi were working to restore power to roughly 30,000 Sunday, most in Mississippi and Arkansas. That was down from a peak of 134,000 outages in the entire Entergy system. Icy roads, deadly tornadoes, punishing waves – severe weekend weather has been blamed for 11 deaths and major damage in parts of the Midwest, South and Northeast. “I could hear everything just coming apart,” Larry Jones, standing amid the rubble in Pickens County, said in a video posted by The Tuscaloosa News. The National Weather Service said it was a tornado packing winds of at least 134 mph (215 kph) that hit Alabama’s Pickens County on Saturday, killing three people. A tornado with 80 mph (about 130 kph) winds touched down in Tazewell on Oct. 31. The storm system spawned a tornado Saturday near Tazewell, in northeast Tennessee, for the second time in less than three months. The National Weather Service said on Twitter that it appeared to have maximum winds of 65 mph (nearly 105 kph). No injuries were reported. While most were expected to be restored later in the day, some in areas of Arkansas and Mississippi with extensive damage might take longer, said spokeswoman Lee Sabatini. A warning sign is covered by ice at Clark Square in Evanston, Ill., Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020. Pounding waves and steady rain brought by a winter storm Saturday forced the closure of parts of Lake Shore Drive and South Shore Drive due to flooding.(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh) A warning sign is covered by ice at Clark Square in Evanston, Ill., Sunday, Jan. 12, 2020. Pounding waves and steady rain brought by a winter storm Saturday forced the closure of parts of Lake Shore Drive and South Shore Drive due to flooding.(AP Photo/Nam Y. Huh) Schlicht said the port’s international docks, which are closed for the season, sustained “significant damage.”center_img “They have had extensive infrastructure damage,” Sabatini said of those two states. For some, it was just the latest outbreak of extreme weather in months. In Wisconsin, high winds, towering waves and flooding caused millions of dollars in damage to Port Milwaukee on Lake Michigan. Port Director Adam Schlicht called it “an unprecedented event at Port Milwaukee.” Near Kiowa, Oklahoma, a man drowned after he was swept away by floodwaters, the Oklahoma Highway Patrol said. In Lubbock, Texas, two first responders were killed when they were hit by a vehicle at the scene of a traffic accident on icy roads; in Iowa, where a semitrailer on Interstate 80 overturned, a passenger was killed in similar road conditions. Alabama Gov. Kay Ivey praised the state’s first responders in a statement Sunday expressing grief over the deaths. “This morning, I have reached out to both the county leadership as well as the legislative delegation to offer my deepest condolences in this terrible loss of life,” Ivey’s statement said. Icy weather also complicated travel in some areas. Winter weather prompted the cancellation of more than 1,200 flights Saturday at Chicago’s two main airports. High winds and icy weather were factors in power outages affecting tens of thousands of people in the South and the Northeast. The PowerOutage.US website, which tracks outages, reported more than 11,000 outages in New York as of Sunday evening. Outage numbers were falling but there remained more than 10,000 without power in West Virginia; roughly 17,000 in the Carolinas; 14,000 in Alabama; 20,000 in Mississippi, and 12,000 in Arkansas. The storms toppled trees, ripped off roofs and, in some areas, reduced buildings to rubble. The National Weather Service confirmed a tornado with winds of around 130 mph (210 kph) hit a high school in Kershaw County, South Carolina on Saturday, causing extensive damage.last_img read more

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A Legacy of Equality: Americans With Disabilities Act Turns 25

first_imgThe ADA helped people with disabilities find and keep jobs, and 25 years later, the U.S. Labor Department is collecting personal stories from grateful workers.(READ more at Bloomberg) – Photo by Steve A Johnson, CCAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMore AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreSunday is the 25th anniversary of the ADA, Americans with Disabilities Act, which made the country a lot more accessible than it was in 1990 when President George H.W. Bush signed the legislation.Wheelchair ramps, now common on businesses, public buildings and street corners in America today, were relatively rare a quarter century ago.The ADA also gave civil rights protections to people with disabilities to ensure they can fully take part in government, public and community life.Dolls with Disabilities Designed to Make All Kids Feel Special The law resulted in a new world of opportunities, including closed captions for the hearing impaired on television, audio descriptions for the blind at movie theaters, wider doors on buildings, and buses with low floors that can reach the sidewalk for easy wheelchair entry.Robert L. Burgdorf, Jr., a disability rights scholar and advocate, wrote the bill that would become the ADA.“In a variety of ways,” he wrote in a Washington Post op-ed column, “The ADA has lived up to the hopeful expectations that accompanied its passage.”Dad Builds “Awesome” Giant Swing so Daughter in Wheelchair Can Playlast_img read more

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Interfaith club hosts ‘Better Together Day’ celebration

first_imgSaint Mary’s students are working together to create a new interfaith group on campus after recent interfaith discussions. Sophomore Alayna Haff said the idea for the club was ignited after Interfaith Youth Core came to campus for a conference earlier this year. Haff discussed Better Together Day, a day that honors interfaith dialogue. “Better Together Day is a national day of action headed by Interfaith Youth Core, a national nonprofit working towards an America where people of different faiths, world views and traditions can bridge divides and find common values to build a shared life together,” Haff said. Julianna McKenna | The Observer Professor Catherine Cornille spoke about the role gender plays in interfaith dialogue Tuesday in Carroll Auditorium.The goal of Better Together Day is to raise awareness about religious diversity and dialogue across college campuses, professor Anita Houck of the Saint Mary’s Religious Studies Department said.“It is an annual day where they invite people to sign up online and bring awareness to the fact that it’s better to have conversations with people who are different from you,” she said. “We want to learn from each other and grow from interaction with other people. Better Together day brings attention to this, especially by getting college age students to talk about these topics.” Religious dialogue is an important aspect of community development, Houck said. “Obviously the most immediate benefit is for us to engage with other interesting people and to get insights about ourselves for those of us that are religious or spiritual or just wanting to develop our own world views,” she said. “We learn so much by talking to people who see the world differently.” She also said engaging in these types of conversations not only advances our religious understanding, but our cultural understanding as well.“We do this by acknowledging commonalities and differences, which allows us to see others as human beings,” Houck said. “It affects our politics, it affects our decisions about who we are going to vote for, what policies we support, the kinds of jokes we are going to make and so forth. It teaches us a lot about ourselves. By learning from other people about how they see the world it clarifies to us about what is really important for us.”Saint Mary’s honored Better Together Day with a lecture by Boston College professor Catherine Cornille on “Women and Interreligious Dialogue.” Cornille argued that women play an integral role in religious dialogue. “Women often are the ones taking initiative to reach out to other religious traditions and because of this are able to break down barriers and are much more open and generous to recognizing truth in other religious traditions,” Cornille said.This is formative in the mission of Saint Mary’s Better Together club, as they plan to appeal to the entire campus community, Haff said.“Our goal for this club is to incorporate our community in working together to make everyone feel included,appreciated and understood,” she said. “We need to be inclusive and understanding of those who are different than us.”Haff said she believes religious dialogue is an important aspect of communication in general. “Research has shown that when someone gets to know a person different from them, their attitudes towards that entire group also grows more positive,” she said. “By learning about other faiths and building relationships with people of different world views, we can break barriers, overcome biases and build bridges.”Tags: Better Together Day, interfaith, interfaith conference, Interfaith Youth Corelast_img read more

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US Representative Earl Blumenauer speaks at Interbike

first_img Related Interbike will open its 2010 International Bicycle Expo in Las Vegas with a special press conference featuring keynote speaker US Representative and Congressional Bike Caucus founder Earl Blumenauer of Oregon.Interbike Show Director Andy Tompkins and Bikes Belong Coalition (BBC) President Tim Blumenthal will introduce the congressman and make a few brief remarks.The purpose of the press conference is to welcome the industry to Interbike 2010, share information about the industry’s show and its future direction, and hear from Blumenauer and Blumenthal on the state of cycling legislation and future government activity on behalf of bicycling.Blumenauer’s visit comes at a critical time as the US government continues to work on the next transportation bill, which will set the tone for cycling infrastructure investments during the next six years.The Congressman will outline where bicycling stands, and where it’s going. He will pinpoint what the industry can do to support the cause. Following the press conference, Blumenauer will spend the day at Interbike visiting with the industry.The press conference will be held on Wednesday 22 September at 8:00am in Casanova Room 603, which is on Level One of the Venetian Las Vegas. All show attendees are invited to attend.Blumenauer will also be the guest of honour at the BikesPAC fundraising reception hosted by Bikes Belong on Tuesday 21 September, the night before the press conference.Blumenauer was elected to the US House of Representatives in 1996, where he quickly established a unique role as a leading proponent of Liveable Communities – places where people are safe, healthy, active and economically secure. He continues to lead the Congressional Bike Caucus and he makes most of his daily trips in Washington by bicycle.Before moving to Washington, Blumenauer was the Commissioner of Public Works in Portland, Oregon, and helped the city earn an international reputation as one of America’s most liveable and cycling-friendly cities.www.interbike.comlast_img read more

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Blue adds Wes Spruell to grow business in southeast US

first_imgAfter a six-month search, Blue Competition Cycles Inc has hired Wes Spruell as its sales representative in the southeast region of the US, an area of the country where the Norcross, Georgia-based company has seen its greatest growth.With more than three decades of experience and a long list of cycling and retail contacts throughout the region, Spruell will be instrumental in helping Blue expand its reach and further increase its sales throughout Georgia, Alabama, Mississippi, Tennessee and North and South Carolina.“This is the region Blue has the greatest penetration and it houses our largest retailer,” said Chance Regina, Blue’s National Marketing Manager. “We didn’t want to just hand it to any old rep.”Growing up in the Atlanta area, Spruell worked in and managed all levels of cycling and outdoor retailers, ranging from small start-up shops and established Atlanta bike shops, including Bicycle South and Peachtree Bikes, to ‘Big Box’ stores such as Bikes*USA and Sportstown.“Wes has an enormous amount of retail experience, which is invaluable when talking to dealers and understanding their day to day struggles,” Regina said. “He is also an avid cycling fan and wants to be part of the industry, thus making him hungry to grow our business. We’re thrilled to add him to our staff.”In addition to his local knowledge, Spruell brings a decade worth of international management experience to Blue from his time at an Atlanta-area global software company. In that role, Spruell handled inventory and budgeting for the company’s locations in Georgia, California and Switzerland and managed seven field-service reps in North America, Canada, Australia, Asia, Switzerland and the UK.www.rideblue.com Relatedlast_img read more

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2XU Appoints Kevin Roberts as Chief Executive Officer

first_img Related 2XU, high performance athletic apparel designer, has announced the appointment of Kevin Roberts as Chief Executive Officer. With 20 years experience in the sporting goods and retail industries, Roberts brings a wealth of knowledge to 2XU, who will lead the brand’s expansion. The news comes just days after 2XU wrapped up sponsorship deals with Lesley Paterson and Caitlin Snow.“2XU represents the pursuit of an incredible global business opportunity,” said Roberts. “I greatly value the entrepreneurial culture of the brand and will continue to foster it moving forward.”With the support of 2XU’s three Co-Founding Directors Clyde Davenport, Aidan Clarke and Jamie Hunt, together with minority investment partner Lazard Australia Private Equity, Roberts is poised to take 2XU from an emerging player to a force to be reckoned with.“We are delighted to welcome Kevin to our team,” said 2XU Co-Founder and Chairman, Clyde Davenport. “With Kevin’s years of building brands and business performance, we now have a cohesive management team in place committed to keeping 2XU focused on growth.”After an early career rising through the ranks in retail and wholesale sales including roles at Asics and Nestle, Roberts joined rugby apparel brand Canterbury, and lead it back to profitability as General Manager in the early 2000s. At age 30, Roberts was appointed Managing Director of Adidas Australia. Roberts ultimately rose to the position of Senior Vice President within Adidas’ Sports Performance Division and was responsible for 9 billion dollars in global revenue.“Kevin shares our beliefs,” remarked Clarke. “He is eager to lead the charge in making 2XU the billion dollar company that it can and will be in the long term.”According to Roberts, 2XU’s overarching philosophy of “human performance multiplied” resonates throughout his personal ethos – passion for the pursuit of excellence in sport, business and life.“Not many people can say they lead a team that creates products to enhance athletic performance and the general health of everyone from weekend warriors to elite athletes,” said Roberts. “I’m lucky enough to make this a career.”With a Degree in Commerce and a Graduate Diploma of Management, Roberts is also a Graduate of International Company Directors Course and the Australian Institute of Sport.www.2XU.comlast_img read more

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Saying concern about deadline prompted move, Hinson details suggestions from his school funding concept

first_imgShawnee Mission Superintendent Jim Hinson.Noting that he was “very disappointed” that legislative leaders had not used the two-year block grant period to craft a new K-12 formula, Shawnee Mission School District Superintendent Jim Hinson on Thursday shared additional details of the funding concept he presented to some Republican elected officials in recent weeks.In a press availability with attorney Fred Logan, who represents the district on some matters related to school finance, Hinson said he was compelled to begin circulating the plan after getting concerned about the impending June deadline for the legislature to develop a new formula.“Did we in Shawnee Mission really want to put our neck out on the line and introduce some of these concepts?” Hinson said. “We were hoping that we could work collaboratively a long time ago to be part of the process. Now we’re having to introduce some ideas to say, okay, folks, let’s get going and let’s look at some opportunities that might be really great for kids.”Among the drivers behind the concept he has worked with others to develop in recent months, Hinson said he believed a new formula should:Include provisions explicitly geared toward addressing the lowest performing 25 percent of students. Hinson suggested the formula should require the legislature to set money aside that would be available to the Kansas State Department of Education to experiment with programs for low-performing students, like a summer school program.Move away from an over-reliance on special weighting categories to determine how much money a specific district receives. The current formula has 14 weighting categories that allow districts to receive enhanced per-pupil revenues. Hinson suggested that number could be reduced to as few as two: English language learners, and at-risk students.Use the funding levels of the districts with the best student outcomes as the basis for minimum per-pupil funding. Hinson suggested this approach would yield a base state aid per pupil of more than $8,000. Logan said such an approach would roll back the evolution of the funding scheme over the past 25 years toward more and more weighting categories. “If you decrease the money that goes into weightings, it only stands to reason that there would be more money available for base state aid per pupil,” Logan said. “I think it’s worth noting that in 1992, when that formula was adopted, there were four weightings. The other weightings came over the years.”Logan argued that the passage of the 1992 formula stripped away much of the local authority property-rich districts like Shawnee Mission, Olathe and Blue Valley had enjoyed for years.“Prior to 1992, schools districts such as Shawnee Mission and Blue Valley were free to use their property tax wealth pretty much in the manner they determined,” Logan said. “And the courts struck that down as inequitable. But I think a lot of people feel that the 1992 formula went too far the other way.”Some local legislators have expressed skepticism in the framework Hinson has put forth, saying that it was unlikely to pass constitutional muster. Rep. Melissa Rooker, who was briefed on the ideas earlier this month, said she saw problems with nearly every part of the approach.“In each section of it, what I see are constitutional problems,” she said.Hinson stressed on Thursday that he was not introducing a bill, but was simply trying to generate conversation as the deadline neared. He said he hoped legislators would not rely on a system that closely mirrored the previous funding formula just because it was easier to do.“[These] might be great ideas, they may not see the light of day,” Hinson said. “But we have the opportunity now to really be innovative and creative because of where we are in school finance in Kansas to really have some discussion about what really is in the best interest of students.”He said he believed all parties — including the education community — bore some of the blame for the current situation.“Certainly I think a lot of the responsibility goes to the legislature, and to the Governor’s office as well,” he said.Hinson said he had no contact with the Governor’s office prior to the release of his concept.Hinson was one of just three Kansas superintendents to lend his district’s support to the block-grant proposal at the time. Then-Blue Valley and Olathe Superintendents Tom Trigg and Marlin Berry have since left the state for other positions.Logan noted that the district’s support of an opportunity to develop a new plan was consistent with the formal legislative policy that has been part of its platform for at least a decade.“[The school board] did that not for support of the block grant system, but [because it was] consistent with their long-held position that there needs to be a new formula,” Logan said.last_img read more

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Lee County Bar conducts annual “Law in the Mall” event

first_img June 1, 2013 Regular News THE LEE COUNTY BAR ASSOCIATION, with Florida Rural Legal Services and Lee County Legal Aid Society, conducted its free annual “Law in the Mall” event April 27 inside the Edison Mall in Ft. Myers. Project Chair Gus Simmons said volunteer attorneys met with individuals to answer legal questions on topics including bankruptcy, civil, elder law, family law, landlord and tenant, criminal, real estate/condominium, and wills, probate, and estate planning. “We were happy to be able to serve our community in need who otherwise would not be able to afford these legal consultations,” said Ty Roland of Aloia, Roland and Lubell.The volunteers also presented four free one-hour seminars on legal topics. Florida Rural Legal Services and Lee County Legal Aid Society provided the public with information about pro bono services for those in need of more extensive free legal assistance. Pictured is Paul E. Lilies of Absolute Law answering questions. Lee County Bar conducts annual “Law in the Mall” eventlast_img read more

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DiveBar plans coral grafting dive

first_img March 15, 2015 Regular News THE DIVEBAR has planned another coral grafting dive for April 18. In partnership with Nova Southeastern University’s Oceanographic Center, the DiveBar created DiveBar Reef off the Broward County coast. The reef was created using staghorn coral fragments removed from corals grown within NSUOC’s offshore nursery. Beginning last year, DiveBar members and sponsors outplanted more than 650 nursery coral fragments. After the April outplanting dive, DiveBar Reef should have over 1,000 corals. The April 18 three-tank dive is scheduled for 8 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. For more information contact [email protected] DiveBar plans coral grafting divelast_img read more

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