Late bump lifts Austin Cindric to Truck Series win at MoSport

first_imgRELATED: Complete results | Playoff picture | Detailed breakdown | Every 2017 winnerBOWMANVILLE, ONTARIO – Canadian Tire Motorsport Park has a knack for hosting dramatic finishes, and Austin Cindric created one of his own in today’s Chevrolet Silverado 250 at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park.A dramatic last-lap incident saw Cindric push his No. 19 Brad Keselowski Racing Ford into the back of the No. 33 GMS Racing Chevrolet of Kaz Grala to push his way past and punch his ticket into the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series playoffs by claiming his first victory of the year.Cindric started the final lap of the 64-lap race less than a truck length behind Grala, and by the time the two rookie racers had reached the back of the circuit at Turn 5 they were nose to tailgate. Cindric made square front-to-back contact with Grala and sent him sideways, which allowed him to move past into the lead and, eventually, into Victory Lane.“I wanted to pass him clean because I’m all about that,” Cindric said. “I feel like this is what NASCAR racing is about. You have to win to make a playoff position. You can’t finish second.“Everyone (who has won at Canadian Tire Motorsport Park) made the move in the last corner. I figured I might as well change that.”Noah Gragson in the No. 18 Kyle Busch Motorsports Toyota squeezed by Grala’s skid to finish in second-place, while Grala recovered and ended the day in third.RELATED: Grala: ‘That was a dump and run’ | Gragson’s emotional reaction to second“He didn’t even attempt to pass,” Grala said of the incident. “He just drove right in there and used me as his brakes, turned me straight around and gave me no opportunity.“Just a dirty move. I’ve got a lot of respect for him as a road course racer but lost a lot today.”Cindric’s victory was made all the more remarkable by how much ground he was forced to recover due to a mid-race penalty. After starting on the pole and winning a caution-free first stage – which earned him his first playoff point of the season – he pitted on Lap 32 and left his stall with the fuel canister still attached, drawing a stop-and-go penalty. Due to the length of the 2.45-mile road course he was able to stay on the lead lap, but he rejoined deep in the field.By five laps in to the final stage, he had worked his way back into top 10. Five laps later, he was back in the top five. And after he pushed his way past Gragson for second on lap 61, he was able to make steady gains over the final three laps to position himself to make his move on Grala.Rounding out the top 10 were Justin Haley, Ryan Truex, Johnny Sauter, Chase Briscoe, Parker Kligerman, Austin Wayne Self, and Ben Rhodes.The Chevrolet Silverado 250 was the second-last race before the start of the NASCAR Camping World Truck Series playoffs. The final chance for drivers to earn a berth comes in two weeks at the Chicagoland 225, which will run on Friday, September 15th.last_img read more

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Today’s Young Generation is More Serious About Volunteering

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreDo you hear people complaining about a tuned-out, apathetic younger generation?Here’s a news flash: Today’s young Americans are more serious about giving back than their parents were.The AP reports, “Those under age 30 now are more likely to say citizens have a “very important obligation” to volunteer, an Associated Press-GfK poll finds.”Today’s youth are raised being attuned, especially in schools, to a volunteering infrastructure that has “grown exponentially since their parents’ day.”(READ the story from AP)Photo by ECU Honors CollegeAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Saint Mary’s Communication Studies department to explore intersectionality with ‘Why Don’t Women Rule the World?’

first_imgTerri Russ, a communication studies associate professor at Saint Mary’s, will teach a new spring semester seminar on “Women, Leadership, and Communication” beginning in 2020. The seminar is titled “Why Don’t Women Rule the World?,” taking its name from one of the course texts.“I used to teach a seminar focused on female beauty and how it operates as a discourse controlling women’s bodies and existence,” Russ said in an email. “While beauty as a discourse still operates in this way, I decided to reframe the class to focus on women as leaders.”This seminar was inspired by the distinct difference in the number of male executives to female, Russ said. Women, especially women of color, have still faced inequality in leadership positions, she said.“There exist many reasons for this inequitable gendered distribution of leadership positions, including the fact that American women today are still enmeshed in a history of cultural practices that dictate how we should behave and appear,” the syllabus reads.This seminar will address the expectations women are held to that preclude them from assuming executive positions.“Daily, we [women] are confronted with these discursive double blinds that demand we be quiet and dainty at the same time we are strong and confident,” the syllabus reads. “These then are the assumptions on which this course is based … that even today women, despite greater access to educational resources, still confront inequitable access to formal leadership roles.”The course will begin by examining Kimberlé Crenshaw’s concept of intersectionality and “the role it plays in how we ‘do’ identity and how all identity expectations are formalized through systemic and structural mechanisms that reinforce dominant gendered norms,” the syllabus states.Crenshaw coined the term “intersectionality” in 1989 to describe the intersection of race, gender and social status within identity.Many more topics and discussions will take place to get students to think critically about career development for women and the barriers they could potentially face, Russ said.“I hope they will gain a comprehensive understanding of the various obstacles they are likely to face as they enter the world after college and dare to take on the label of ‘leader,’” Russ said.Russ said she hopes students will be more prepared for their futures as they work towards their goals, keeping in mind they might face challenges that could potentially limit their ambitions.“One of the key things this class offers is opening a space in which students can reflect on what it means to be a woman in 2020 and hear about the experiences of women who are actively engaging with being a leader during a time when women are still considered lesser-than,” Russ said.There will be guest speakers throughout the course to offer different perspectives into being a female in today’s workforce.“I am excited to have the opportunity to not only discuss what it means to be a woman leader at this moment in time, but also to allow for multi-generational collaboration and support,” Russ said.Tags: Communication Studies, Feminism, intersectionality, Kimberlé Crenshaw, women, women in the workplacelast_img read more

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Broadway Vets Karen Mason and Mark Jacoby to Lead Stephen Schwartz Show Snapshots at Goodspeed

first_img Mason has been seen on Broadway in Wonderland, Hairspray, Mamma Mia!, Sunset Boulevard, Jerome Robbins’ Broadway and Play Me a Country Song. Jacoby received a Tony nomination for Show Boat. He also starred in the original Broadway productions of Ragtime and Elf. His other Broadway credits include The Phantom of the Opera, Grand Hotel and Sweet Charity. In addition to Mason and Jacoby, the cast of Snapshots will feature Broadway alums Elizabeth Stanley (Company) as Susan and Matthew Scott (Jersey Boys) as Daniel, as well as Ephie Aardema as Susie and Dan DeLuca as Danny. Conceived by Michael Scheman and book writer David Stern (The Scottsboro Boys), Snapshots blends some of the best-loved music from Schwartz’s Broadway shows, including Wicked, Pippin and Godspell, along with some of his lesser-known tunes. The musical follows Sue (Mason) and Dan (Jacoby), a couple who, after 20 years of marriage, have drifted apart. Together they discover a box of photographs which leads them to relive the memories of their past selves captured in the snapshots. Karen Mason and Tony nominee Mark Jacoby will lead the cast of the Goodspeed Musicals production of Snapshots: A Musical Scrapbook, a new work that borrows from the catalogue of composer Stephen Schwartz. Directed by Daniel Goldstein (who helmed the recent Broadway revival of Schwartz’s Godspell), performances of the romantic comedy will begin October 24 at the Norma Terris Theatre in Chester, CT. View Commentslast_img read more

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New outdoor education resource launched by Green Mountain Club

first_imgThe Green Mountain Club today launched www.LongTrailBound.org(link is external), an innovative outdoor education resource guide and community forum for Vermont educators.â The Green Mountains are a fantastic outdoor classroom and a place for children to explore and learn’said Marge Fish of Londonderry, president of the Green Mountain Club. â The Long Trail Bound resource guide will help educators and youth develop a connection to the mountains and inspire students to become life-long outdoor learners and environmental stewards.âDesigned by a committee of Green Mountain Club volunteers and staff, the Long Trail Bound website will feature twenty activities to be used in the classroom, the home, or on the trail. Topics include teaching outdoor skills, fostering stewardship and sense of place, and teaching about the mountain ecosystem. Wednesdayâ s launch coincided with National Environmental Education Week.Ripton teacher Susan Ogilvie, an educator who has utilized the Long Trail Bound activities, said, â I find the Long Trail Bound guide to be extremely useful in teaching my third and fourth grade students about the Long Trail. The lessons give each hike a focus making them a powerful learning experience.âThe website will serve as a community forum for educators across the state to share experiences, ideas and resources. A list of additional suggested resources and hikes will also be provided.The activities are also being used by Green Mountain Club staff in a series of outdoor education programs with the Montessori School in Montpelier to teach students how to prepare for a hike, nutrition for the trail and map and compass skills. Club staff and volunteers will also continue to utilize these skills and techniques at camps, classrooms and events across the state.The 10,000 member clubâ s mission statement itself explains: â The mission of the Green Mountain Club is to make the Vermont mountains play a larger part in the life of the people by protecting and maintaining the Long Trail system and fostering, through education, the stewardship of Vermont’s hiking trails and mountains.ââ At a time when America fights to get kids outdoors and active, it is a no brainer that we invest in outdoor education both to better steward the land we love and support healthy living,’said Will Wiquist, executive director of the Green Mountain Club.To introduce the guide to educators, the GMC will hold a two-day Long Trail Bound Educator Summit August 14-15 at the clubâ s visitor center in Waterbury Center, VT. Check out the new resource guide at www.longtrailbound.org(link is external).Funding for the Long Trail Bound expansion was generously provided by the Jane B. Cook 1992 Charitable Trust, Harris and Frances Block Foundation, International Paper, Windham Foundation, Oakland Foundation, Patrick Foundation, and the 100on100 Relay.Green Mountain Club. 4.17.2012.last_img read more

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Weekly unemployment claims climb back near 1,000

first_imgWeekly unemployment claims increased in Mid-May for the first time in two weeks. For the week there were 968 new regular benefit claims for Unemployment Insurance in Vermont. This is an increase of 236 claims from the week before, and 63 fewer than last year’s total.Altogether 7,499 new and continuing claims were filed, a decrease of 60 from a week ago and 1,616 fewer than a year ago. The Department also processed 1,418 First Tier claims for benefits under Emergency Unemployment Compensation, 2008 (EUC08), 7 fewer than a week ago. In addition, there were 738 Second Tier claims for benefits processed under the EUC08 program, which is 9 more than the week before. The Unemployment Weekly Report can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/(link is external). Previously released Unemployment Weekly Reports and other UI reports can be found at: http://www.vtlmi.info/lmipub.htm#uc(link is external)  Vermont’s unemployment rate fell two-tenths to 4.6 percent in April. This is the lowest rate in New England and fourth lowest in the US. See statistics below and story HERE.last_img read more

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153 organisations with Bike League’s Bicycle Friendly Business awards

first_imgThe League of American Bicyclists has recognised 153 organisations with Bicycle Friendly Business (BFB) awards. The awards recognise five first-time applicants, which earned the highest Platinum award, and the League welcomed the first major airport to the BFB program, Tampa International Airport.The League of American Bicyclists celebrates the communities, businesses and universities joining the movement to make biking better each year through its Bicycle Friendly America awards.‘From a transportation hub like Tampa International Airport, which hosts nearly 60,000 employees and visitors each day, to a business known for its bicycle hubs such as Industry Nine (moved up to Gold status), companies and organizations are transforming the status quo at the local level when they welcome people who bike.’“There are few better grassroots ways to make bicycling an easy transportation choice for people than by destinations – the places we want and need to go – becoming Bicycle Friendly Businesses,” said Bill Nesper, Executive Director of the League of American Bicyclists. “We’re thrilled that these 153 businesses are part of this movement to make our communities stronger, safer, and more connected through bicycling.”“It shows how much thought an organisation has put into welcoming people who bike when it earns a Platinum award on its first application, like Walton Enterprises,” said Amelia Neptune, Director of the Bicycle Friendly America program. “But it’s also really impressive to see businesses taking progressive steps to upgrade their award over the years, like Phoenix Bikes, a youth development non-profit in Arlington, Virginia, that moved up to Platinum this round.”This round of Bicycle Friendly Businesses also shows how communities are rallying around bicycling being good for businesses. Places like Arlington, Va., Asheville, N.C., Lincoln, Neb., Northwest Arkansas, and Tampa, Fla., are home to multiple businesses earning awards in 2020.Some other facts to note from this round of Bicycle Friendly Business awards:8 organizations were given an Honourable Mention for their efforts to welcome bicyclists17 bike shops were recognized this round in addition to five companies in the bike industryAwarded businesses in this round employ a total of 36,529 peopleThe Bicycle Friendly Business program recognizes organizations for the role they play in the ecosystem of building a ‘more Bicycle Friendly America for everyone’. The League also awards Bicycle Friendly Universities and Bicycle Friendly Communities throughout the year.www.bikeleague.org/business Relatedlast_img read more

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Attention neuron type identified: New understanding of how brain’s frontal lobes control behavior

first_imgShare Email LinkedIn Share on Facebook Share on Twittercenter_img Pinterest Researchers at Karolinska Institutet in Stockholm, Sweden, have identified for the first time a cell type in the brain of mice that is integral to attention. By manipulating the activity of this cell type, the scientists were able to enhance attention in mice. The results, which are published in the journal Cell, add to the understanding of how the brain’s frontal lobes work and control behaviour.The frontal cortex of the brain plays a crucial part in cognitive functions, including everyday mental processes such as attention, memory, learning, decision-making and problem-solving. However, little is known about how the frontal cortex performs these mental processes, including which neuronal cell types are involved. A longstanding theory holds that parvalbumin-expressing neurons (PV cells) play a key role in cognition; now, however, researchers show that PV cells seem to be not only essential to attention; it also appears that it is enough to optimise PV cell activity in order to enhance attention.The team focused on attention since it is a cognitive process that is affected in many neuropsychiatric disorders. The scientists trained mice to perform a task requiring a high degree of attention, and recorded the activity of hundreds of individual neurons in the frontal cortex while the animals repetitively performed the task. “We found that the activity of the PV cells reflected the animals’ level of attention,” says lead investigator Marie Carlén at the Department of Neuroscience. “The PV cells were highly active if the animals were attentive, and less active when they were inattentive. The differences were so great that we were able to predict if an animal would perform the task successfully or not merely by looking at the activity of the PV cells.”The researchers used optogenetics to influence PV-cell activity during the seconds the animals needed to be attentive. They found that the animals’ attention was impaired when they either inhibited or changed the pattern of this activity. However, they also found a type of manipulation that could improve attention. During certain cognitive processes a category of brain waves known as gamma oscillations (30-80 Hz) increases in prefrontal cortex, and when the scientists activated the PV cells at gamma frequencies the animals solved the task more times.While cognitive problems are common in mental disorders such as schizophrenia, ADHD and autism, there is currently no effective medicine available.“Our findings tie together a number of previous observations on PV cells and their involvement in cognition and neuropsychiatric disorders, and demonstrate this cell type’s critical role in cognition and psychiatry,” says Dr Carlén. “The findings also show that it’s possible to enhance cognitive functions by altering the activity of a single neuron type, which is quite astonishing when you think of how complex the brain is. PV cells are therefore a very interesting target for the pharmaceutical industry.”last_img read more

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Flu Scan for Jan 02, 2014

first_imgStudy suggests preschool kids, non-elderly adults most susceptible to H1N1A serologic survey from British Columbia suggests that preschool children and working-age adults are the groups most susceptible to the pandemic 2009 H1N1 influenza virus, by far the most common strain in North America so far this flu season.The survey, conducted in the Vancouver, B.C., area last spring, showed that fewer than 20% of children under 5 years old had H1N1 antibody titers suggesting protection, according to findings presented on ProMED-mail by Danuta Skowronski, MD, of the British Columbia Centre for Disease Control.Protective antibody levels (titers of 40 or higher) were found in 45% to 50% of adults of ages 20 to 39 years and in 35% to 40% of those ages 40 to 69, Skowronski wrote. Seroprotection was most prevalent—60% or higher—in school-age children and in adults 70 and older.”Our age-related observations for the spring 2013 suggest pre-school children and young or middle-aged adults are currently the most susceptible” to 2009 H1N1 infection, she wrote.She noted that more than 80% of flu viruses subtyped in British Columbia this season have been 2009 H1N1, and serious outcomes have been reported in some young and middle-aged adults. This has come amid “a striking absence of other more typical early warning signals of influenza circulation such as school or long-term care facility (LTCF) outbreaks.”The seroprotection findings “may help put current surveillance trends into context,” Skowronski wrote. “Given the greater seroprotection identified in school children and the elderly, it could be speculated that A(H1N1)pdm09 is propagating more surreptitiously through adult contact networks without the usual school or LTCF outbreaks as expected surveillance signals and with dampened activity levels overall at the community level.”The overall prevalence of H1N1 antibodies found in the serologic survey approached 50%, which was similar to findings in the spring of 2010, following the 2009 pandemic, but age-specific findings were slightly different, she reported.Jan 1 ProMED-mail post Related Dec 20 CIDRAP News story H9N2 confirmed in Chinese childHealth officials in China yesterday announced an H9N2 avian influenza infection in a 7-year-old boy from Hunan province, marking the second H9N2 case reported in China this week.Hong Kong’s Centre for Health Protection (CHP) said today that the boy, from the city of Yongzhou, had a fever and runny nose on Nov 19 and was treated at a hospital the next day. The CHP said Chinese health officials confirmed the case yesterday and reported that the boy had a history of contact with poultry.Human infections with H9N2 influenza are sporadically reported and usually cause mild respiratory symptoms. On Dec 30 the CHP reported the virus in an 86-year-old Hong Kong man who currently lives in Shenzhen, across the border from Hong Kong. The man’s H9N2 infection was the first reported in the area in 4 years.Jan 2 CHP statement Dec 30 CIDRAP News item “Hong Kong reports H9N2 flu case”last_img read more

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Udall Joins 19 Senate Colleagues On Bipartisan Resolution To Advance Equal Rights Amendment

first_imgThe House Judiciary Committee passed a companion resolution to extend the ERA ratification deadline earlier this month. The full House is expected to vote on the resolution in December. WASHINGTON, D.C. ― U.S. Sen. Tom Udall (D-N.M.) joined 19 of his Senate colleagues on a bipartisan resolution to advance the Equal Rights Amendment (ERA), a proposed Constitutional amendment to guarantee equal rights regardless of sex. Article V of the U.S. Constitution establishes that constitutional amendments must be proposed by Congress with a two-thirds majority, or a convention called for by two-thirds of State legislatures. Congress passed the Equal Rights Amendment in 1970 and voted to extend the ERA ratification in 1978. The ERA does not need White House approval but must be ratified by three-fourths of the states (38 out of 50). “Our country was founded on the promise of equality and freedom for all, but we have work to do to finish the fight,” Udall said. “Each generation has pushed us further along the path to fulfill our country’s original promises. It is now our turn, and we must remove the barriers to ratifying an amendment that our country should have adopted nearly half a century ago to ensure that women have the same legal rights as men in this nation. I urge my Senate colleagues to pass this resolution to reflect the will of the American people and affirm that each person – regardless of sex – is entitled to equal protection under the law.” In addition to Udall, the resolution was cosponsored by Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), Jeff Merkley (D-Ore.), Ben Cardin (D-Md.), Lisa Murkowski (R-Alaska), Susan Collins (R-Maine), Angus King (I-Maine), Mark Warner (D-Va.), Tim Kaine (D-Va.), Charles Schumer (D-N.Y.), Kyrsten Sinema (D-Ariz.), Dianne Feinstein (D-Calif.), Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.), Richard Durbin (D-Ill.), Edward J. Markey (D-Mass.), Chris Van Hollen (D-Md.), Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.), Jeanne Shaheen (D-N.H.), Kirsten Gillibrand (D-N.Y.), and Jack Reed (D-R.I.). U.S. SENATE News:center_img The bipartisan resolution Udall is supporting would remove a 1982 deadline for ratification of the ERA, thereby paving the way for full and equal protections for women under the Constitution. Illinois ratified the ERA in May 2018, bringing the total number of states ratifying the amendment to 37. Only one more state is needed to adopt the ERA into the U.S. Constitution. Virginia’s legislature is expected to debate ERA ratification as soon as January 2020. Removing the 1982 deadline for ratification, as Udall’s resolution does, is necessary to complete the process once a 38th state ratifies the amendment. Thirty-seven states have already ratified the ERA, just one short of the 38 needed to adopt the amendment to the U.S. Constitution. Virginia is expected to soon become the 38th state to ratify the ERA. Once a 38th state ratifies the amendment, removing the arbitrary deadline – as this resolution does – is necessary to complete the process and ensure the amendment can be ratified in the Constitution. U.S. Sen. Tom Udalllast_img read more

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