Too much of a good thing

first_imgAs our political leaders lamented the plight of the Union’s jobless, one of Ireland’s top business leaders was due in town. Eager to show that power and influence had not gone to his head, the intrepid captain of industry told ‘his people’ back in Ireland not to bother ordering a chauffeur-driven Mercedes to meet him – he would take a taxi.But he had failed to take into account the effect the summit would have on the availability of taxis. To put it another way, there was an enormous queue.At this point the Irish industrial mogul decided enough was enough. He turned around, got back on the aircraft which had just brought him over from Dublin and was home in time for a pint of Guinness by the banks of the Liffey.last_img read more

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Listening Closely with Alan Evans and AE3

first_imgOliver BurkatAnyone lucky enough to experience the retro-funk scene revival in recent years has undoubtedly enjoyed at least one or more dose of Soulive, the jazz/funk/soul power-trio that formed in 1999. This lucky person may also be wise enough to realize that you can’t have that stanky funk without a drummer who lives, sleeps, eats, and breathes the stuff. Alan Evans, drummer for Soulive and front-man, writer and producer of his new band, the Alan Evans Trio (AE3), is the embodiment of that person. Or that cat, I should say. Funk, anthropomorphized.Sunday night at Brooklyn Bowl, funk was the ingredient du jour, and the Alan Evans Trio was the main course. But since nobody likes a stand-alone entrée, AE3 had some help in the form of Mr. Breakdown, a 7-piece ensemble from Nyack, NY, as well as SHMEEANS & the Expanded Consciousness, the brainchild of Adam “Shmeeans” Smirnoff, rhythm guitarist and breakdown master of Lettuce. The Expanded Consciousness enlightened with the help of perpetually cheesing bass-beast Chris Laughlin, Pete Levin on keys (Blind Boys of Alabama), and the unmistakable hop-crack gangster lean of Adam Deitch on drums (Lettuce, Break Science). Both were tasty appetizers indeed, making the oncoming main course that much more enticing. Between Mr. Deitch and Mr. Evans, Brooklyn Bowl was a funk-drum fiend’s paradise.After such pleasing appetizers that would satisfy any normal appetite, AE3 took the stage for the final night of their 29-show tour in support of their debut album Drop Hop; everyone in the room had to unbutton their proverbial pants to make room for the main dish. Flanked by Beau Sasser (Melvin Sparks, Akashik Record) on organ and Danny Mayer (On The Spot Trio) on guitar, Evans fell in to a deep hole of soul. He and the rest of the room remained for the rest of the evening. Counting off the first tune, Evans shouted “1, 2, 3!” followed by a one-count drum fill, launching “They Call Me Velvet.” A diverse and charging tune, AE3 was obviously in the zone.Following the introduction was the promise of “our greatest hits… all the way back from February – when we started… some brand new tunes… [that] we will record for our next album, right before we head to Bear Creek.”Crushing their album’s opening track, “Authoritay” utilized Mayer’s swinging guitar rhythm complimented by a patient yet soaring solo, all backed by Sasser’s expert organ spurts.Then the breakfast chef in me got a bit over-excited.“Right about now,” Evans preached from his percussive pulpit, “we are gonna play a brand new tune, hot off the presses. And this song, ladies and gentlemen, is all about… pancakes. Pancakes! Drippin’ butter, syrup, and a side of bacon. This next tune is titled ‘Hot Cakes Meltdown.’” Hard, driving funk echoing a frenetic songbird, Mayer’s staccato guitar worked from verse to effortless solo and let all those in attendance know that they were still piping hot on the plate, begging the crowd’s full attention. Holding down the low-end bass with his left hand, Sasser had the pocket ingrained, giving Evans and Mayer their chance to shine and really open the throttle before a quick cut breakdown to end Mayer’s solo. It created a very chilled out vibe. Exploding into his own solo, Sasser didn’t hesitate to show the crowd why Evans chose him as a brother in rhythm on keys, highlighting his left brain/right brain duality. The band then segued seamlessly into their album’s title track “Drop Hop”, a straight-forward 12-bar blues strut. Gaining in intensity with every phrase, Sasser got a chance to really scream on his organ before Mayer jumped back in with a roaring blues solo emanating the band’s 60s/70s influences, all while reinventing the sound for the 21st century.In tribute to a great influence, Evans quizzed the audience about the Mothers of Invention’s Jeff Simmons, and Simmons’ little-known song-writing collaboration with Frank Zappa (Zappa rarely had co-writers) before launching into the slow, soul waltz “Lucille Has Messed My Mind Up”, with Evans crooning.Two songs from Drop Hop closed the AE3 set. “Crooooz”, a laid-back tune featuring guitar and key vamps, got the audience grooving and comfortable before transforming – as all great jazz groups do – into something barely recognizable from the beginning of the song. They explored all aural possibilities only to eventually find their way back to the head.That indefinable feeling that comes from the perfect groove morphed into indefinite improvisation – all held together with artist mastery until resolution – is something that the AE3 has mastered in the studio and let run wild in concert. If there is one thing the musical brain loves, its resolution, and AE3 distributes.“Check Your Lugnuts”, a reference to the hardware that maintains a tight fit between drum and drum head, was the perfect close to the AE3 set. Between Evans’ syncopated ride cymbal bell-hits were dirty chord progressions crafted by decades of research. A band tighter than a snare drum head, the AE3 proved that whether on wax or in person, they are a band for all ages, delivering heart-felt, powerful soul, blues and funk to those of us smart enough to listen.Alan was nice enough to sit down and chat with L4LM before the show, where we learned about the tour, the album, and one of the best venues in the world.L4LM: AE3 recorded Drop Hop in 5 days. You wrote every part and sent them to Beau and Danny to learn before the recording session; how long did it take you to write those songs?Let’s see… Some of those tunes on the album, maybe 2 or 3 of them, I had in the can from when I built my new studio at home. They were kinda like the first thing I did to see what it sounded like in there. And then I had the idea to record an EP. That was back when Beau and Danny and I were just like “yeah, we’ll record a few tunes…” So then, I got home from Jam Cruise, and I was like “Man, you know what? If I’m gonna have this opportunity to record, I might as well just do an album.” So I just wrote the rest of the album. That was like a tune a day, or sometimes maybe two in a day. I don’t know… all in all, it took me a week or so to write the whole album…Beau and I have been playing together for a while now on his regular gig, because we live like right next to each other. After one gig, we just kind of got in to something, and it just hit me – it definitely inspired me. I don’t like writing tunes just to write – honestly I just can’t – there has to be some kind of purpose or inspiration, you know?L4LM: For sure. How does your experience differ between playing with your brother (Neal Evans, Soulive) and playing with Beau?Mmmm… wow…that’s a… good question. I mean, playing with Neal… it’s kind of like no one’s there… it’s very invisible. Obviously I know he’s there but…it’s really hard to explain.L4LM: You’re just in each other’s heads, I suppose?Yeah, yeah – we’ve literally been playing together our entire lives, so it’s just a different thing. So there’s obviously differences between playing with Neal and other cats. But, playing with Neal for so long, it makes it very easy for me to find other cats to play with. In that, I know from a few seconds in that “nope… nope… you’re outta here” It’s just not gonna work, know what I mean? It’s not me trying to be a jerk or anything, it’s just that the bar is pretty high. So it doesn’t take me long to figure who I can actually really play with, who gets what I’m doing, and I get what they’re doing. So in that way, it really helps. Obviously, every player is different, and their take on things is totally different. That’s the one thing that I can point out that helps me play with other cats.L4LM: How did your parents influence your musical tastes and the instruments that you play?Well, music has always been a part of life for us growing up – there was always music on. There were drums in the house, so I was hitting drums when I was like 9 months old, and Neal about the same. One of our uncles played piano, another played drums. All of a sudden Neal comes home one day from school and told my parents he wanted to play piano, just out of the blue – so they just went out and got a piano. The thing is man, music was just always, always on in our house. And our father was very cool – [one of] the biggest things with music with my father was listening – we’d walk thru the room and he’d say “hey, sit down here” “listen – who’s playing tenor here? Who’s playing bass?” And that was just huge man – that gave me a huge appreciation for music – for songs – for musicians. And that’s why I play different instruments. It was never just about the drums – never “practice all day” – it was just about music. And these instruments are just secondary. I’ll play any instrument. It’s just about the music, you know?L4LM: Definitely. In that vein – I don’t know if you guys notice this when you’re up on stage – but when I go to a show, I’m really there to listen, and it really bothers me when people around me are talking too loud during a show, especially in an intimate place like City Winery, for example. We’re all trying to listen, and listen closely – not enough people understand that I think. Listening is so important.I hear that – it’s interesting – we go to Japan a lot – and it actually takes a little while to get used to – because in Japan, if you break it down, and play something really quiet, you can literally – and this is not an exaggeration – you can literally hear a pin drop in the joint. Because people don’t say anything, they’re just chillin’, listening, you know? It’s actually a little disorienting at first, because you’re going from playing in San Francisco, then you hop on a flight, [and all of a sudden] you’re in Japan – you break it down [and] it’s like wooooaaaahhhhh… So yeah I definitely dig that when people are really paying attention.L4LM:  I saw that you give drums lessons sometimes. How often do you practice and how often do you teach?How often do I practice? uh….L4LM: And it’s OK to say “not much” because I know, as a drummer…(Laughs) Nah, nah, I wasn’t gonna say “not much,” I was gonna say “never.” (laughs) You know, I attempt… to practice. But the thing is, I really dislike playing drums by themselves… I don’t know, it’s just boring. So what happens is, I sit down in the studio and I start playing something, and I get an idea for a song, and then I go over and pick up the guitar… (laughs)L4LM: Ha ha. More like practicing music making.Yeah, exactly, so to me, I realized a long time ago that that’s just not me. I went through that phase of just like, shedding drums for hours and… it’s just not in me. It’s not who I am. I guess my kind of practicing is just writing music. I’m just listening. A lot of my practice is just listening – I just can’t help it – anything I hear anywhere, it just seeps in, and I’ll go home and try to figure out the tune from what I heard… That’s just my thing.The thing about me and lessons is – I’m not the type of cat who people come back to every week. A lot of it is more philosophy… I get a lot of drummers who come for drum lessons, but what I try to instill in musicians who come to me, younger or older, is that it’s not just about teaching drums – and I’m just talking my philosophy of music – I mean yes, you can sit in a room and practice 12 hours a day, but the problem with that, is that you’re not communicating with anyone but yourself – so when you get out on a gig, you’ve got nothing to say. So yeah, practice – but also take a hike, go walk somewhere, get some exercise, experience life. So you have something to bring to your music. I also tell people, “be a drummer, that’s great, nothing wrong with that– but pick up another instrument”, try and get in the heads of your fellow musicians on stage. You don’t have to be proficient at it, but just attempting to play a different instrument will give you an appreciation for what other cats on stage are doing, and it will automatically open up your ears; you’ll be listening, and learning, while you’re playing with these cats on stage. So that’s what a lot of my “drum” lessons consist of. And if I don’t see you for 5 or 10 years, that’s cool, you know? If you’ve taken something from it, that’s all that really matters to me.L4LM: What do you love to do when you’re not playing music?I love exercising man – I love messing around with my car… I love hangin’ out with my family, dude – we just kick it. I just love enjoying my time off, and just experiencing life.L4LM: Besides other musicians, what external (non-musical) sources inspire your musical creativity?Well, I guess for me, I never know where it’s gonna come from, so I just leave myself open to everything… it’s funny man, you just never know – I could get up in the morning, go downstairs, and start making some food, and it just hits me. Or I’m sitting in line at the bank, and it hits me – you just never know. So with that said, I don’t point to any one, or two, or any fifty external experiences from just music – but I just kind of walk around and soak it all in. License to be a space-cadet, you know? (laughs)L4LM: Where did the phrase “Drop Hop” originate?I thought it went with the style of music and the time period that I was thinking of when writing the music. I just kind of imagined: sometimes you see these old-school album covers from the 60s or whatever – some random cats – and they have some title – “Drop Hop” – what does that mean? I have no idea. But it sounded relevant to the specific time that I imagined in my head. It’s about conveying a feeling rather than a meaning.L4LM: You just played about 30 dates in 40 nights or so. How has the band progressed while on tour?Well, everything gets tighter every night, then we discover new things. When we first started, it was much more serious, trying to play all the tunes right and everything, but as that happens and you get that together – we’re finding we’re having a lot of fun with it on stage (laughs) – we’re definitely doing stuff that I wouldn’t do with Soulive, which is cool – this is kind of more my personality that is coming through. The cool thing is too, Beau and Danny and I, we have a very similar humor (laughs), so it’s developing into this really great thing – you can tell how much fun we’re having on stage, and we’re trying to drag people along (chuckles).L4LM: How does Brooklyn Bowl compare to other venues you’ve played, and why did you decide to end the tour there? Or was the decision more logistical?There is no venue that compares to Brooklyn Bowl, you know what I mean? (chuckles)L4LM: Agreed, Agreed.It’s an amazing spot, man. When we got the opportunity to… it was just kinda perfect. We’re playing Northampton the night before, and Beau and I live right there, so logistically it would have been great to end the tour right there (chuckles). But, to end it in New York at Brooklyn Bowl is pretty, pretty special man, I’m really psyched – Obviously, I’ve played there a bunch, but to go play there for the first time with this band, as our last night of the tour, I’m really, really looking forward to it. It should be a really good time.And a good time it was. Thank you so much Alan for taking the time to talk with L4LM. And thank you for reminding us that when dealing with music, the most important part is listening. We look forward to another album and tour.Download the Whole Show Here:  http://archive.org/details/aet2012-09-30.mk21.flac24last_img read more

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SUB announces concert cancellation

first_imgAfter winning a national competition through the online crowd-funding platform Tilt, Notre Dame was set to host the Chainsmokers, a rising DJ duo, last Saturday night. However, on Friday afternoon, the Student Union Board announced via a Facebook post that the concert was cancelled. “This was a Tilt event, organized by a third party application and not SUB or Notre Dame. … This ultimately made it impossible for us to host the artist on campus,” the post said.Eric Richelsen Tilt created a contest in which universities nationwide were invited to purchase tickets to a Chainsmokers concert in advance. The five universities purchasing the most tickets “won” a concert at their school. Notre Dame joined University of California-Davis, University of California-Santa Barbara, University of Connecticut and University of Texas-Austin as winners of the concert. SUB said they were unable to reach an agreement, citing contract negotiation issues.“While we did everything we could well in advance to partner with Tilt and provide The Chainsmokers with a venue on campus for the benefit of Notre Dame students, their agency was unfortunately unable to meet our standard contract expectations,” the post said. According to Tilt campus representative, senior Vince Saladino, a number of contracts were discussed, but the parties were unable to reach an agreement.“There were three sets of lawyers dealing with the contracts — Tilt, Notre Dame and the Chainsmokers. There wasn’t a version of the contract that all three wanted to sign,” Saladino said. “We weren’t told the specifics of what was the issue, and I’ve heard the million and a half rumors going around as to what it was, but I don’t know for sure.”Upon hearing news of the cancellation, students expressed discontent with the way the event was coordinated.“The disorganization of Tilt has been extremely disappointing,” sophomore Colleen O’Neill said. “Although it was confirmed to us that we won this Chainsmokers concert, little to no information has been provided otherwise.”O’Neill said she did not know what contract issues halted the contract negotiations, but said she thought there would have been more advanced planning. “In my opinion, Tilt should have contacted the University prior to holding the contest to ensure that everything was checked out before charging students for the tickets of a concert that had many things hanging in the balance,” O’Neill said. Freshman Natalie Treadwell ran a music blog in high school, which led to a friendship with Andrew Taggart and Alex Pall, two musicians who eventually collaborated to form the Chainsmokers. “We worked a lot with Alex and Drew before they really became the Chainsmokers,” Treadwell said. “… I’m actually in the #Selfie music video … so I was pretty excited when I found out we won the Tilt concert,” Treadwell said. Treadwell then reached out to Taggart and Pall, asking them if she could help in any way with the event.“Drew responded by saying they knew nothing about the concert and that planning would be up to Tilt. … This was my first red flag,” Treadwell said. “Tilt is a great platform to get funding for something like a concert or a dorm event, but they are not coordinated enough to actually put one on themselves. This was their first time trying to put on an event like this. When they started it, they didn’t know which campuses it would be on, how or where the concert was going to be, or who to help coordinate the event.”A few days after Notre Dame won the concert, Treadwell applied to be a campus representative for Tilt. She said she was granted an interview with Tilt coordinators, but ultimately was not offered a position because she was a freshman.“This interview gave me a huge insight into what kind of company Tilt is,” Treadwell said. “After my interview, I was pretty convinced that the concert wasn’t going to happen because the people left to do the job had no idea what they were doing.“Notre Dame is not a campus where kids rage. A concert like the Chainsmokers draws huge concerns for the University, and they were unwilling to reach a contractual agreement. I think the failure is due to a mix of the University’s concern for an out of control rave and Tilt’s inability to facilitate such a large event.”Contract negotiations are ongoing and, according to Saladino, they are still trying to set a concert date for mid-April. Students who purchased tickets on Tilt can use them for the future concert or receive a refund on happiness.tilt.com.“Stepan is still Tilt’s top choice since it is the highest capacity venue and does not have 21+ restrictions. They’re hoping to have the contract down as soon as possible for it,” Saladino said.Treadwell said she is disappointed with Tilt and the University, not with the musicians themselves.“They are some of the funniest, honest and normal artists I worked with. They didn’t have a big ego, even though they knew their music was good,” Treadwell said. “From all our interactions, they seemed very upset with how this worked out. All and all, they are great musicians but really they’re just two guys who met at NYU and became wildly successful best friends.”Tags: chainsmokers, Concert, SUB, tiltlast_img read more

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Central Middle School band hits right notes, earns impressive 12th ranking Texas

first_img During each contest level, five adjudicators listened to the recordings and ranked the bands. Central advanced in all three levels, culminating in the 12th-place state finish.As part of the TMEA Honor Band process, middle schools were required to submit three selections, including one march, from recordings of competitive concert or festival performances in the current year.Central’s music selections were Aces of the Air by K.L. King, The Steppes of Russia by Elliot Del Borgo and Blue Ridge Saga by James Swearingen. Central’s submission came from performances that took place in April and May. The Central Middle School Symphonic Band from Nederland placed 12th among 2C middle schools at the state level of the TMEA Honor Band taping competition.In an issued statement, the school said this is a competitive band competition held every two years by classification and includes the best bands from across Texas.Hundreds of middle school bands competed in three tiers: region, area and state. The competition began at the region level, which was held during the first week of June. Only the first- and second-place bands were allowed to advance to the next tier. The area competition took place during the last week of June and the state competition was held in late July. Directors for the band are Eric Rose and Jonathan Blake.Special to The Newslast_img read more

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National average gas prices fall for 38th straight day. Where does Texas stand?

first_img The lowest price in the state today is $1.25/g while the highest is $2.54/g, a difference of $1.29/g.The national average price of gasoline has fallen 10.1 cents per gallon in the last week, averaging $1.97/g today.The national average is down 45.5 cents per gallon from a month ago and stands 72.7 cents per gallon lower than a year ago.“Motorists should continue to be vigilant if they need to fill their tanks- bring hand sanitizer and potentially wipes, but also shop around as the gap between station widens to historic levels,” DeHaan said. Gas prices in Texas are 38.0 cents per gallon lower than a month ago and stand 71.0 cents per gallon lower than a year ago.“With the nation continuing to be under siege from the coronavirus and millions staying parked at home, there’s quite a bit more downside that’s in the pipeline coming in the weeks ahead,” DeHaan said. “We could easily see the national average fall 50 cents to a dollar per gallon, while pricey states like California will see the biggest drops to come, playing catch up to the drop that has seen twenty nine states average gas prices fall under $2.”According to GasBuddy price reports, the cheapest station in Texas is priced at $1.25/g today while the most expensive is $2.54/g, a difference of $1.29/g. Today is the 38th straight day the national average gas price has fallen, and the first week of the national average being under $2/gal for the first time in over four years.Patrick DeHaan, head of petroleum analysis for GasBuddy, said motorists continue to park their cars and shelter in place, leading to an unprecedented drop never before seen in U.S. gasoline demand, “causing prices to sink like a rock.”Texas gas prices have fallen 10.5 cents per gallon in the past week, averaging $1.75/g today, according to GasBuddy’s daily survey of 13,114 stations.center_img Historical gasoline prices in Texas and the national average going back ten years:March 30, 2019: $2.46/g (U.S. Average: $2.70/g)March 30, 2018: $2.41/g (U.S. Average: $2.65/g)March 30, 2017: $2.11/g (U.S. Average: $2.32/g)March 30, 2016: $1.89/g (U.S. Average: $2.05/g)March 30, 2015: $2.21/g (U.S. Average: $2.42/g)March 30, 2014: $3.36/g (U.S. Average: $3.55/g)March 30, 2013: $3.52/g (U.S. Average: $3.64/g)March 30, 2012: $3.82/g (U.S. Average: $3.93/g)March 30, 2011: $3.50/g (U.S. Average: $3.60/g)March 30, 2010: $2.66/g (U.S. Average: $2.78/g)Neighboring areas and their current gas prices:• Midland Odessa – $1.88/g, down 12.0 cents per gallon from last week’s $2.00/g.• San Antonio – $1.66/g, down 9.2 cents per gallon from last week’s $1.76/g.• Austin – $1.70/g, down 8.6 cents per gallon from last week’s $1.79/g.last_img read more

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Reader’s Rides: Revanche Ombromanto From Tuscany

first_imgImage courtesy of Emanuel FerrettiRevanche Bicycles from Tuscany, Italy has shared the Ombromanto.  Custom built with a mix of Columbus Spirit, Life and Max tubing, the fillet-brazed beauty features a modern oversize bottom bracket and tapered headtube.A well made fillet brazed bike can also be beautiful before paint when well built. See the details shots before and after paint after the break…Image courtesy of Emanuel FerrettiDesigned to be modern, fast, elegant and efficient, the Ombromanto features aero seatstays and a “squoval” downtube, not typically found on a classically built steel frame.Image courtesy of Emanuel FerrettiBuilder Emanuel Ferretti apprenticed under Simoncini for two years before recently setting out on his own, starting Revanche. He keeps a blog of his work here.Image courtesy of Emanuel FerrettiWhen a bike looks this good before paint, you know there is a great craftsman behind it.Image courtesy of Emanuel Ferrettilast_img read more

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How Music Can Fight Prejudice

first_imgThe outpouring of hostility toward immigrants and refugees has reminded us that ethnocentrism remains a fact of life in both Europe and the United States. Combating it will require teaching a new generation to view members of different cultures as potential friends rather than threatening outsiders. But what mode of communication has the power to stimulate such a shift?New research from Portugal suggests the answer may be music.It reports schoolchildren around age 11 who learned about the music and culture of a faraway land expressed warmer feelings toward immigrants from that country than those who did not. What’s more, those positive emotions were still evident three months after this exposure to the foreign culture.“Music can inspire people to travel to other emotional worlds,” writes a research team led by psychologist Felix Neto of the University of Porto. Their work suggests songs can serve as an emotional bridge between cultures, revealing feelings that are common to both. Read the whole story: Pacific Standard More of our Members in the Media >last_img read more

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Mattituck Man Indicted After Fatal Accident

first_imgKeith Clancy, 32, of Mattituck, was high on fentanyl when he struck and killed a pedestrian on July 14, a Suffolk Grand Jury decided last week.Suffolk County District Attorney Timothy Sini announced the unsealing of an 11-count indictment against Clancy that detailed the allegations. At approximately 12:21 PM July 14, Clancy was driving a 2014 Nissan sedan southbound on Lake Avenue in St. James when he left his lane, crossing onto the shoulder of the road and striking northbound jogger Michael McDermott, 37, of Smithtown.“Drugged driving is often deadly, as it was in this case,” Sini said. “We lost a beloved member of our community and nothing will bring him back. We will seek justice in this case.”Clancy is charged with two counts of aggravated vehicular homicide, a B felony; manslaughter in the second degree, a C felony; vehicular manslaughter in the second degree, a D felony; leaving the scene of an accident without reporting, a D felony; tampering with physical evidence, an E felony; driving while ability impaired by drugs, an E felony; aggravated unlicensed operation of a motor vehicle in the first degree, an E felony; reckless endangerment in the second degree, an A misdemeanor; possession of a controlled substance in the seventh degree, an A misdemeanor; and reckless driving, an unclassified misdemeanor.Clancy allegedly left the scene of the crash. He was apprehended by Suffolk County police officers at approximately 12:49 PM while traveling eastbound on the Long Island Expressway near exit 69 in Manorville.Clancy’s vehicle was severely damaged, with a large hole in its windshield and blood on both the exterior and interior of the car. The vehicle was also missing its front license plate, which was recovered at the scene of the crash. A blood test taken approximately three-and-a-half hours after the crash revealed a high level of fentanyl in Clancy’s blood. A search warrant executed on Clancy’s vehicle resulted in the seizure of a glassine envelope of the drug.He is currently free on bail that was set at $250,000 cash or $500,000 bond. He is due back in court September 10. Clancy faces a maximum sentence of eight and one-third to 25 years in prison.Southold TownSouthold Town police arrested a Cutchogue man they suspect was driving drunk after he struck a utility pole on Bridge Lane at about 4 AM Friday, August 9. Peter Martin, 25, was charged with driving while intoxicated, a misdemeanor, as well as a marijuana violation, police said, and held for arraignment later that morning.Southold police arrested a Cutchogue man on Wednesday, August 7, after he allegedly grabbed a rifle during a dispute with another man said to be his landlord.At about 7:30, a call came in that Andrew Watroba, 40, allegedly made threatening statements and then locked himself inside his Aldrich Lane residence. Southold Police responded and surrounded the home. A Suffolk County police emergency services unit was also called. Watroba came out on his own accord and was arrested for an active warrant stemming from a prior incident.On Shelter IslandShelter Island police reported three arrests for drinking and driving. On Thursday, August 8, Robin O’Reilly, 54, of Manhattan, was observed changing lanes unsafely, police said. After pulling her over, police ascertained she had been drinking excessively. She was arraigned the next morning and released on her own recognizance.Three days earlier, police said they noticed a driver making an illegal left turn, and pulled her over. Lauren Dickerson, 65, was impaired by drugs, they concluded. She was so charged, and an additional charge of unlawful possession of marijuana was leveled. She was arraigned and RORed in justice court. Police said they pulled Galit Shrvit, 43, of Sag Harbor, over July 31 for assorted traffic infractions. Police said field tests revealed she was intoxicated. Shrvit will answer the charges next [email protected] Sharelast_img read more

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Chancery Lane seeks family contracts extension

first_imgThe Law Society has called on the Legal Services Commission to extend existing family contracts until April 2012, following Chancery Lane’s successful High Court challenge to the family tender process. However, some firms that did win family contracts through the tender process are now understood to be considering seeking compensation from the LSC if it fails to overturn the result. A week ago Lord Justice Moses found in favour of the Law Society, ruling that the LSC’s process for awarding new family contracts was unlawful, effectively quashing the outcome). The tender would have reduced the number of family providers from 2,400 to 1,300. Moses said the LSC’s failure to give adequate notice of the selection criteria meant it had ‘arbitrarily and unfairly’ distinguished between providers, and deprived some of those most in need of the opportunity to obtain the services of experienced family lawyers. He said the failure to give notice was ‘irrational’, and defeated the LSC’s own objective of obtaining high-quality services from the best-qualified lawyers. The LSC was ordered to pay the Law Society’s legal costs of around £300,000. LSC chair Sir Bill Callaghan said the LSC was ‘disappointed’ by the result and is considering the judgment and whether to appeal. A statement on the LSC’s website said it was conscious of the uncertainty for providers, and would publish further information in due course. The current contracts are due to expire in November, having been extended for a month. Meanwhile, the government is currently considering cuts to legal aid as part of its spending review, including proposals to restrict legal aid in private law family cases. A Law Society spokesman said: ‘The Law Society has requested that the LSC extend the original contracts until April 2012, and await the outcome of the government’s spending review, to devise a new tender process that fits with where we are today.’ Roy Morgan, director of the Legal Aid Practitioners Group, said: ‘Extending the family contracts until after the spending review is sensible because it will dictate what happens, regardless of the judicial review’. However, he added that this would mean the old contracts for family work will be running at the same time as new social welfare contracts, creating a problem. Commenting on solicitor reaction to the outcome of the judicial review, Morgan said: ‘Those not given contracts are pleased, but a lot of firms that were awarded contracts and who made preparations based on that have now been left in limbo, and some are considering compensation claims [against the LSC].’ See President’s Podiumlast_img read more

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