In Major Victory for the Environment, Germany Bans Single-Use Plastic and Styrofoam

first_imgAddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMoreGermany is making major strides towards trying to practice what she preaches in terms of environmentalism.The country announcement yesterday that it will be implementing a ban on the sale of a multitude of single-use and disposable items in a bid to reduce the amount of plastic and polystyrene waste in the environment.This includes things like plastic straws, polystyrene cups and boxes (think Cup-O-Noodles), single-use cutlery, plates, and stirring sticks.POPULAR: Record Set For Largest Haul of Plastic Removed From The Great Pacific Garbage Patch By Hawaii GroupGerman Environmental Minister Schulze said the move was part of an effort to move away from “throw-away culture,” according to AP.The government’s ban will go into effect next year on July 3, 2021.The new plan also legislates the closure by 2022 of eight brown-coal operations—mostly located in economically depressed regions—as the number of jobs in renewable energy, which already generates 50% of Germany’s power, increase in those regions.RELATED: New Plant-Based Bottles and Cups Backed by Coca-Cola And Dannon Can Degrade in a Year(Photo by Swansea University)GIVE a Thumb’s Up And Show Your Support By Sharing on Social Media…AddThis Sharing ButtonsShare to FacebookFacebookFacebookShare to TwitterTwitterTwitterShare to EmailEmailEmailShare to RedditRedditRedditShare to MoreAddThisMorelast_img read more

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Center for Social Concerns sponsors lecture on human dignity

first_imgBy EMMA BORNE News Writer On Thursday, Clemens Sedmak, professor of moral and social theology at King’s College in London, spoke on dignity and justice at the annual Center for Social Concerns Fr. Bernie Clark lecture.   The lecture, titled “The Deep Practice of Human Dignity,” focused on three key ideas: the concept of human dignity, the concept of integrity and the concept of deep practice.  Sedmak said human dignity is not only a concept, but also a way of life.  “[Human dignity] is a way of experiencing, a way of thinking and a way of acting,” Sedmak said. “Dignity is not only something that can be used as a concept; you need to do it. It needs to have this kind of cash value.”   Human dignity is closely related to human integrity, Sedmak said.  “The concept of dignity and integrity are linked because of the focus on vulnerability in both. … Human dignity needs an understanding of vulnerability,” she said. “Vulnerability is important because it violates integrity.” In order to understand others’ vulnerability as a concept, Sedmak said, “we have to understand our own vulnerability.” Sedmak said understanding our own vulnerability in turn allows us to practice human dignity, clarifying the third point of his lecture.   Humans need to practice human dignity for the simple reason of being human, Sedmak said. “The concept of human dignity is command and the command consists in saying: value the human person because she is human,” Sedmak said. “And that is where the justification stops.”  Even in a difficult circumstance, Sedmak said the practice of human dignity comes with the concept of being whole-hearted.  “Deep practice has these two properties: there are adverse circumstances… and secondly a moment of whole heartedness,” Sedmak said. “If you want to appropriate a skill under adverse circumstances, you must be fully motivated.” Though deep practices are not easy, Sedmak said deep practices are essential to human dignity.  “If we want the concept of dignity to have friction we need to appropriate it by way of deep practices,” Sedmak said.  Contact EmmaBorne at [email protected]last_img read more

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Joel Pinnt’s research offers historical look at Beat Bob contest

first_imgMost you have probably never given a second thought to who has won the I Beat Bob West contest the most times. I’ve wondered periodically but never gave it much thought until a fellow named Joel Pinnt from Nederland e-mailed me about it last winter. Pinnt, who is a transplanted Nebraska Cornhusker, forced me to ruefully admit that I really hadn’t kept year-to-year records on the contest results. He then blew me away by offering to pour through 24 years of newspaper microfilm to put together a history I could use as I saw fit. With the contest’s 25th anniversary kicking off today, this is the perfect time to take a walk down memory lane with all you folks who have participated religiously over the years. And, hopefully, to encourage potential newcomers to flip over to page 3B and fill in picks for week one. The contest began in 1982, at the suggestion of then Port Arthur News publisher Harry Wood. I wasn’t all that crazy about it at first, but when I saw how much interest it generated my only lament was that I couldn’t claim the idea as my own. Over the years we’ve tinkered slightly with the format, such as going through a period where we included a “guest expert” on our newspaper panel. Those guests included the likes of Bum Phillips, Jimmy Johnson, Billy Tubbs, Greg Davis, Little Joe Washington and golfer Bruce Lietzke. I’d call them or fax them the list of games and they would send back their selections. One December we even worked Santa Claus, complete with the requisite mug shot at the top, into Beat Bob. He does a lot better job delivering toys than picking winners. The idea from the beginning was for readers to have a shot at prizes and publicity by beating me and posting the best overall record of the week. Finishing in the top 10 has usually been worth a cap monogrammed with “I Beat Bob West” and “Port Arthur News.” The best record, provided it Beat Bob, has been good for helmet clocks, windbreakers, windshirts and travel bags. Our nicest gifts, in my opinion, were Dallas Cowboys and Houston Oilers helmet clocks featuring likenesses of Jimmy Johnson and Bum Phillips. One year the top prize was a clock shaped in the state of Texas, with a photo of then Gov. Ann Richards. Another time, when Billy Tubbs was at Oklahoma, we gave basketball shaped clocks adorned with Tubbs’ mug. As a bonus, the weekly winner earned the bragging rights of having his/her name and record listed in the newspaper with the following week’s games. Our most famous winner is probably Minnesota Twins outfielder Lew Ford, who won while he was playing football at Port Neches-Groves. Another time, Lew and his brother Shelby tied for the best record and were still tied after the tiebreaker. Shelby won the playoff the following week. For good measure, their dad, Buck Ford, also made it to the winner’s circle. The most prolific winner has been Port Arthuran Stan Norman, who has been five times a champion. Norman won the that very first year of 1982, then didn’t win again until 1998. He also had winning weeks in 2000, 2002 and 2005. Close behind for bragging rights is Pinnt, who had wins in 1998, 2000, 2002 and 2005. E.E. Booker of Groves also claimed the top prize four times. His wins were in 1987, 1990, 1993 and 1999. A handful of others — Jerry Broussard, Bob Carlos, Jeff Coward, the late Ford Freeman, Mike Tarver and Tom Wooley — had threepeats. Twenty five others have won twice. Among the quirks of the contest is the fact that winning records have ranged anywhere from 14-6 to 20-0. Aside from one crazy week in 1983, when 23 different players posted 20-0 marks and Ronnie Barrow won on the tiebreaker, only four other players — David Gough in 1984, Booker in 1987, Dana Stansbury in 1993 and Bonita Fisher in 1998 — have sailed through 20-0. Three others — A.S. Perales (1986) J.D. Evans (2002) and Keith Morvant (2005) — won with 15-0 records. Lots of players have gone 19-1 or 18-2 and lost out on the big prize, usually on the tiebreaker. Sad to say, the contest’s namesake has never posted a perfect record. He has, however, had the best overall record four times, meaning no prizes were distributed that week. Also noteworthy was Ryan Carlos winning back-to-back in 1988, Michelle Plokhooy tying for first in week one of 1988, then winning outright the next week and Bevil Deckert tying with his 14-year-old son Brandon in 1989 and winning the tiebreaker. Also, in 2005, Jeff Keeney won in week one and his 17-year-old daughter, Miranda, won in week four. No to be outdone the Garcias — Maurice and 17-year-old daughter Yjaira — won in weeks five and seven. All total, there have been 246 top-prize winners and roughly 2,500 I Beat Bob West caps passed out. The winners have ranged from A (Ricci Anderson) to Z (Beverly Zerko). The only letters in the alphabet without a winner are O, U and X. As part of the 25th anniversary, we’ll be running the names of past winners each week in alphabetical order. Check ‘em out to see how many you know. Perhaps the most eye-opening history lesson from all of Pinnt’s research was seeing how many schools from that very first contest in 1982 no longer exist. Seven high schools — TJ, Lincoln, Stephen F. Austin, Bishop Byrne, French, South Park and Beaumont-Charlton-Pollard have closed their doors. Add on Lamar University, which dropped football after the 1988 season, and the Houston Oilers, who moved to Tennessee in 1996, and that’s nine teams no longer playing. That’s stunning. Oh, well, it’s time to look ahead. Good luck to all you prognosticators in 2006. I have a feeling you’re going to need it to beat the guy whose mug runs with this column. Sports editor Bob West can be e-mailed at [email protected] His Sportsrap radio show is moving to Wednesday’s (Sept. 6) at 8:05 p.m. on KLVI (560-AM)last_img read more

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Robbery of vehicle lands one juvenile in jail, more charges may be filed

first_imgBeaumont police arrested a 15-year-old girl late Friday, charging her with unauthorized use of a motor vehicle.The arrest was connected to a robbery in which a victim’s vehicle was taken at gunpoint at 4115 Jeanette in Beaumont. The juvenile was arrested but detectives will continue to investigate the incident and more charges may be filed.  The juvenile suspect was transported to Minnie Rogers and released to their custody. Police said in an issued statement that the victim told police an unknown juvenile approached her, displayed a firearm and demanded her vehicle. He then took the vehicle and fled.Police located the vehicle 22 minutes later at the Pine Club Apartments, 5015 Pine St. A female juvenile was behind the wheel.last_img read more

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New epigenetic mechanism revealed in brain cells

first_imgFor decades, researchers in the genetics field have theorized that the protein spools around which DNA is wound, histones, remain constant in the brain, never changing after development in the womb. Now, researchers from the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai have discovered that histones are steadily replaced in brain cells throughout life – a process which helps to switch genes on and off. This histone replacement, known as turnover, enables our genetic machinery to adapt to our environment by prompting gene expression, the conversion of genes into the proteins that comprise cellular structures and carry signals in the brain.This new concept, described in a study led by researchers in the Department of Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai, and at the Laboratory of Chromatin Biology and Epigenetics, The Rockefeller University, was published today in the journal Neuron.The study’s findings argue against the long-held belief that histones, part of the chromatin structure that package and protect genetic material in chromosomes, are highly stable proteins in non-dividing cells like nerve cells. The study authors argue that aging histones are instead constantly replaced with new histones, rather than being created once and remaining attached to DNA throughout a person’s life. The newfound mechanism is epigenetic, meaning it fine-tunes gene expression without changing the DNA code we inherit from our parents. The study results revolve around the fact that, although some cell types, such as skin cells, constantly self-destruct and are replaced in an ongoing turnover that keeps tissues viable, others, such as nerve and heart cells, are programmed to perform specific functions with complex genetic memory involved, and do not often divide. With few exceptions, humans get one supply in the womb that must last a lifetime. Therefore, these cells must be highly adaptable, able to form new connections and behave differently depending on outside factors encountered. The research team found that histone turnover regulates how genes in the brain are turned on and off in response to various stimuli, thereby allowing neurons to form new synaptic connections.“These are very exciting results, creating a new front in the field of chromatin biology,” said Ian Maze, PhD, Assistant Professor of Pharmacology and Systems Therapeutics at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai. “By identifying this new mechanism of epigenetic regulation, or changes to gene expression caused by external and environmental factors, this work provides a novel conceptual framework for further studies aimed at identifying the molecular underpinnings of neurodevelopmental disease and psychiatric illness.”Specifically, the study examined a specific type of histone called H3.3 in human and rodent brains. H3.3 is a version of the histone H3 with a small random genetic change in its code, and thus a small difference in its protein structure. Cells with this version of H3.3 frequently turn over their histones.To study histone composition in mouse nerve cells and related turnover, researchers fed young, post-weaning rodents a special diet containing heavy labeled lysines, a process known as staple isotope labeling of amino acids in cell cultures and live mice. When examining the nerve cells, researchers explored whether the H3.3 variant was labeled with that stable isotope (“new” histones) or if they were free of the label (“older” histones). This was accomplished by isolating individual neurons from the mice and performing mass spectrometry. The prevalence of the labeled H3.3 demonstrated the fact that the older histones had been replaced with newer ones, indicating histone turnover.In humans, researchers used a technique called 14C/12C bomb pulse dating to measure turnover. The technique is based on the fact that high levels of radioactive carbon (14C) were released into the atmosphere during the 1950s and 1960s, when open-air nuclear bomb testing occurred following the Second World War. Researchers can take samples from cells – in this case, purified H3.3 samples from brain cells of postmortem human brains, and determine present 14C/12C ratios from the time of death against past atmospheric levels from the time of the subject’s birth. As with the rodent observations, the researchers found that H3.3 turnover occurs in the human brain throughout life.Additionally, the researchers deliberately manipulated H3.3 dynamics in both embryonic and adult neurons, confirming the role of histone turnover in neuronal plasticity. The findings thus establish histone turnover as a critical, and new, regulator of cell-type specific transcription in the brain.“Histone turnover, shown through our work with H3.3, is essential for the behavior of brain cells,” said Dr. Maze. “Furthering our understanding of how the brain works, learns, forms new memories and reacts to changes in the environment can help us to find new ways to treat neurodegenerative diseases and mental illness.” Share on Facebook Share Pinterestcenter_img LinkedIn Email Share on Twitterlast_img read more

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NEWS SCAN: Antiviral-resistant flu, DARPA flu study grant, test for meningitis-causing fungus, yellow fever in Sudan

first_imgJan 11, 2013Study: 2% of flu viruses from 2008 to 2011 were antiviral-resistantThe first 3 years of data from the Influenza Resistance Information Study that began in 2008 show that resistance to the neuraminidase inhibitor (NI) class of antiviral drugs was 2.2% overall and mostly found in patients 1 to 5 years old, according to a report yesterday in Clinical Infectious Diseases. The study, which included 1,799 lab-confirmed influenza cases, also found that all 47 seasonal H1N1 viruses tested (not pandemic 2009 H1N1, or pH1N1) were resistant to NIs, which include the commonly prescribed oseltamivir (Tamiflu) and zanamivir (Relenza). Of the patients, 1,281 had influenza A (47 seasonal H1N1, 335 H3N2, and 899 pH1N1) and 518 had influenza B. NIs were distributed to 1,041 (58%) of the patients (26, 245, 514, and 256, respectively). All seasonal H1N1 strains were genotypically and phenotypically resistant to oseltamivir, but no genotypic resistance was detected in samples of any other subtypes taken on the first day of symptoms (baseline). Mutation-specific polymerase chain reaction, however, detected resistance to oseltamivir in 19 patients (17 pH1N1, 2 H3N2) post-baseline, 14 of whom were kids 5 and younger.Jan 10 Clin Infect Dis abstractDARPA grant supports flu evolution studyA University of Massachusetts Medical School research team has received a $12 million grant from the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency (DARPA) to develop new ways to predict flu virus changes from antiviral drug and immune system pressures. The project is led by Robert W. Finberg, MD, chair and professor of medicine at the school, according to a press release yesterday from the school. One approach is to conduct deep genetic sequencing of the flu virus before and after it is exposed to a pressure such as an antiviral drug. Finberg said in the release that he hopes the work will help predict how the virus evolves to escape immune system defenses. Determining what the future flu viruses will be might improve the accuracy of selecting the strains likely to cause severe disease in humans, which could lead to a better targeted vaccine, according to the release.Jan 10 UMass Medical School press releaseScientists develop PCR test for fungal meningitis pathogenUS scientists have developed a real-time polymerase chain reaction test for rapidly detecting Exserohilum rostratum, the pathogen primarily responsible for hundreds of cases of fungal meningitis from tainted vials of methylprednisolone acetate. The assay was highly accurate and detected the fungus efficiently, according to a study in the Journal of Clinical Microbiology. Researchers tested the assay on seven separate isolates of E rostratum, and the test was able to detect the pathogen in amounts as small as 100 femtograms. The team was also able to detect three closely related species: E longirostratum, E mcginnisii, and E gedarefense.Jan 9 J Clin Microbiol abstractYellow fever cases in Sudan reach 849; vaccination drive progressesThe count of yellow fever cases in the Darfur region of Sudan has reached 849, with 171 deaths, and the second phase of a vaccination campaign there is nearly complete, according to a Jan 10 ReliefWeb report from the United Nations Office for the Coordination of Humanitarian Affairs. The report, citing the Sudanese government and the World Health Organization (WHO), said the epidemic has affected 35 localities throughout Darfur. The case-fatality rate is 20.1%. Phase 2 of the vaccination drive has reached about 1.1 million people, or 93% of the targeted population in South, West, and Central Darfur. The report said the WHO has recommended a third-stage vaccination drive targeting about 2 million people. The first shipment of vaccine for that effort, 670,400 doses, is scheduled to arrive Jan 14. In other activity, blood sampling for a national yellow fever risk assessment was completed on Dec 29 with the collection of 1,754 samples from eight sites. The samples will be analyzed at the National Public Health Laboratory in Khartoum.Jan 10 ReliefWeb reportlast_img read more

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PBMC Golf Classic Rescheduled

first_imgThe Peconic Bay Medical Center Golf Classic benefiting the Kanas Regional Heart Center has been rescheduled to Monday, September 14. The tournament, for which registration begins at 9:30 AM with a shotgun start slated for 10 AM, will be held at the North Fork Country Club in Cutchogue. The event is presented by Dr. Stan Zinberg, a retired physician out of Remsenburg who previously served as deputy executive vice president for the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, in Washington, D.C. and chief of obstetricians at New York Downtown Hospital, and chaired by John Kanas, Jr. Kanas Jr. and his wife, Elaine, started the John and Elaine Kanas Family Foundation with a $5 million gift that boosted Peconic Bay’s cardiac care program. The Kanas Regional Heart Center, which began life-saving, interventional cardiac care — including cardiac stents — on the East End for the first time in 2016, moved into the Corey Critical Care Pavilion in January of this year. Dr. Zinberg’s support of the medical center began in 2008, when his wife, Peggy, was treated in the emergency department. Dr. Zinberg was impressed with the attentive care his wife received, but also saw opportunities for improving the hospital’s facilities. After her recovery, the couple decided to donate $100,000 to help fund renovations to Peconic Bay’s patient admitting area. “We were appreciative for the level of professional, quality care I received,” said Peggy Zinberg, who is a registered nurse. “We saw a way to show our gratitude that would benefit the whole community, so we did it.” The couple also donated $1 million to help build the Kanas Regional Heart Center. “Peggy and I have been fortunate in many ways, not the least of which is being residents of one of the finest communities on Earth,” Dr. Stan Zinberg said. “We are happy to join our neighbors and friends in supporting the health and well-being of our shared community.” At 2 PM the day of the golf tournament, there will be an awards ceremony and barbecue lunch. Sponsorships and foursomes can be reserved today by calling 631-548-6166. Registration can also be done online at pbmcfoundation.thankyou4caring.org/golf. For more information, call Candace Porter, assistant director of special events, at 631-548-6166 or email [email protected]@indyeastend.com Sharelast_img read more

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CGG, Sovcomflot in Arctic seismic survey pact

first_imgCGG, a world leader in Geoscience, and Sovcomflot, Russia’s largest energy shipping company, announced today that they have signed an agreement to form a joint venture company dedicated to conducting high-end 3D marine seismic acquisition services with a focus on Arctic and sub-Arctic waters.One of CGG’s seismic acquisition vesselsThe joint venture, to be called Arctic Geophysical Exploration (AGE), will be 51 per cent owned by Sovcomflot and 49 per cent owned by CGG. The company will be incorporated in Russia with its headquarters in Moscow. Under the terms of the agreement, CGG will charter a fourteen-streamer ice-class vessel while Sovcomflot will add the capabilities of an eight-streamer ice-class vessel.The primary aim of the joint venture company is to offer world-class 3D marine seismic acquisition services to operators during the Arctic navigation season. In addition, the new company will offer its highly advanced vessel capabilities to the international market for the remainder of the year while benefiting from access to the most advanced seismic technologies from CGG’s worldwide operational and technical support.CGG and Sovcomflot will have a combined total of four vessels scheduled to operate on client projects during the 2014 Arctic navigation season and expect the joint venture to be fully operational by Q4 2014 in order to capture the growing 3D seismic market in this region.Jean-Georges Malcor, CEO, CGG, said: “The Russian Arctic is an exciting new frontier that has increasingly shown its potential over the last two years. By bringing together the two companies’ strong HSE cultures, Sovcomflot’s considerable Arctic maritime experience and Russian presence along with CGG’s expertise as a leading technology provider, we believe this joint venture will create a strong vehicle for growth in this demanding region.”Sergey Frank, President & CEO, OAO Sovcomflot, said: “By combining Sovcomflot’s in-depth knowledge and experience of operating in the Arctic with CGG’s global expertise in marine seismic operations, we have created a powerful new Russian marine seismic company able to meet the most demanding technical and operational challenges of the Arctic region, whilst also being able to offer a competitive range of seismic services internationally.” [mappress]Press Release, June 19, 2014last_img read more

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A cure for the cashflow

first_imgIn the uncertainty of this post-EU referendum world it is not surprising that the siren call from industry is for government to pump more money into infrastructure. I hope the chancellor will grant this wish in his Autumn Statement. There’s nothing wrong with this message but, given the appalling low levels of productivity in the industry, the taxpayer could be paying over the odds. Why is that?I’ll answer my own question with another. What is the biggest killer of productivity in UK construction? Answer: poor cashflow.Trade credit insurance company Euler Hermes has described 2015 as one of the worst years for payment delays: “Construction companies registered more payment delays than any other single UK sector last year […] the sector suffered a 26% year-on-year rise in the number of overdue payment incidents in 2015 [overdue being more than two months after the payments should have been discharged].” Poor payment practices are gradually crippling the industry. Bank lending to the sector has fallen by almost half in the years since the beginning of the recessionFrom my own research, I can add that in 2015 small firms across the UK lost almost £50m worth of retentions following upstream insolvencies.Poor payment practices are gradually crippling the industry. Bank lending to the sector has fallen by almost half in the years since the beginning of the recession. The so-called supply chain finance initiative has turned into a profitable income stream for a few of the large UK contractors as a result of the fees charged for having early access to one’s cash (usually after an extension to pre-existing payment periods).It’s no wonder that construction has the worst record for productivity. Where is the cash for the supply chain (which delivers 85% of the value) to invest in new technologies and skills development? The state of Western Australia has decided to act: As from 30 September 2016 project bank accounts (PBA) will be mandatory on the majority of state government projectsThe state’s Construction Contracts Act 2004 will be amended to reduce payment times from 50 days to 30 daysUnder the above act, cash retentions have to be ring-fenced in a trust but more detailed statutory arrangements will now be introduced to reinforce the existing statutory obligationProspective tenderers will be banned from state contracts for poor payment performanceThere is the possibility of statutory penalties involving fines to firms guilty of repetitive payment abuse of their supply chains.These measures reflect the frustration of the state’s government in failing to make progress on this issue. What are we doing in the UK? Over here PBAs continue to make strong progress. From 31 October 2016, PBAs will be mandated on building projects of more than £4m procured by Scottish government bodies. But government departments and agencies not using them should be challenged to state the “compelling reasons” for their non-use.Regulation 113 of the Public Contracts Regulations 2015 – which places a statutory duty on public bodies to ensure 30-day payment clauses are inserted in supply chain contracts – was a welcome provision. However, there is concern it lacks effective enforcement as complaints about non-compliance can only be directed through the Mystery Shopper Scheme.The government is reviewing the practice of retentions with a view to consulting industry on the outcome of the review. Anything less than a statutory ring-fencing of cash retentions is unlikely to lead to dramatic change.Other more general initiatives include the appointment of the small business commissioner and the implementation of Section 3 of the Small Business, Enterprise and Employment Act 2015. The commissioner won’t be appointed until the middle/end of next year. The government is about to consult on how the commissioner should handle payment complaints. As I explained in a recent column (“Someone to watch over SMEs”, 27 May 2016, page 42), the commissioner is unlikely to have significant impact on construction.It is expected that Section 3 will come into force next April. This will require large firms to report on their payment practices and policies. There is real concern that some businesses may manipulate their data. Given the lack of effective auditing, enforcement could be problematic.I can’t help wondering whether what’s currently on offer will cure our cashflow ills. Perhaps we should take a leaf out of Western Australia’s book and implement the measures they are proposing.Professor Rudi Klein is a barrister and chief executive of the Specialist Engineering Contractors’ Grouplast_img read more

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DSV USA completes UTi merger

first_imgWith this integration, the divisions – DSV Road USA and DSV Solutions USA – have been added to DSV’s US organisation, and will be headed up by Jacques Retief and Michael Marlow, respectively.The DSV Air & Sea organisation in the USA now has over 1,000 employees across 36 offices.www.us.dsv.comwww.go2uti.comlast_img

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